(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Centennial, Dekalb, Illinois : DeKalb, 1856-1956 progress unlimited"

CENTENNIAL 

DEKALB, ILLINOIS 




547 
.D3 



ROGRESS UNLIMITED 




FROM THE 




OF TODAY 



As far back as 1912 DEKALB achieved national recognition as the trademark 
for fine quality milk wagons. It was in 1912 that the DEKALB Wagon Company 
developed the step-up quick delivery cart. It eliminated the precarious hub jump- 
ing to a high perched seat for drivers with a drop-center delivery wagon, some of 
which are still in use in the dairy industry. From the drop-center wagon DE- 
KALB went to the drop-frame truck with "stand-drive" controls. Through the 
years DEKALB research and design has been responsible for other advancements; 
including "jig-built" construction, plastic bodies and the new "Lumberjack" retail 
lumber delivery unit. Today, in nearly every field of endeavor involving commer- 
cial transportation you find evidence of DEKALB workmanship and support for 
the slogan . . . "America's Finest Products Are Delivered in America's Finest 
Bodies . . . DEKALB! " 




DeKalb 



COMMERCIAL BODY CORPORATION 

DEKALB • ILLINOIS 






SAUK VALLEY CC LIBHABY 



3 1516 00016 2642 



lik 2). 




ti 



eev cr^n-vvtecLaiLon 



Three factors have made the DeKalb Centennial an undertaking of considerable size and ex- 
treme importance. The first was our desire to give respectful and fitting tribute to the pioneers 
of the past and the senior citizens of today who, through their foresight, industry, and civic pride, 
have made DeKalb what it is today. 

The need for a civic celebration of such broad scope that it would encompass our fellow 
citizens from all walks of life was also recognized. That the DeKalb Centennial has enjoyed 
greater and more enthusiastic participation than any previous event in city history is indeed grati- 
fying. 

Notwithstanding the importance of the first two factors, however, we must necessarily look 
ahead and conclude that it is the setting of a progressive, more active, and more service-minded 
pattern for the future that is the element which gives our participation its reason for being. 

Our past duly honored, our present merrily celebrated, and our future course of civic re- 
sponsibility firmly set, we pause to express our deep appreciation for the unsurpassed coopera- 
tion, hard work, financial support, and loyalty to DeKalb which has guided the actions of all 
those whose lives the DeKalb Centennial has touched. 

THE DE KALB CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 

J. E. Rolfing, President 
J. M. Morris. General Chairman 
Francis R. Geigle, Vice-President 
Francis E. Cash, Co-Treasurer 

Arthur J. Krupp, Co-Treasurer 
DeWitt Osgood, Secretary 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

John Boardman 
Helene Collin 
Jessie Glidden 
Philmore Iskowich 
A. W. Jackson 
Adrian Jacobson 
E. E. Miller 
C. Edward Raymond 



SAUK VALLEY COLLEGE 
LRC 012501 



Page 1 



DeKalb's Centennial 

1856 - 1956 

By Georgia Anna Kuecks 

A haven from the endless, swampy plains 
Was built by God with river and with trees, 
And men who ventured onward to the west 
At this oasis paused; and in their ease 
Marvelled, as slowly the spell 
Of destiny engulfed them. 

On such a blessed spot some were to stay 

And thrive ; God meant it so. 

They felt His power enabling them to prove 

Their might exceeding that of every foe. 

Indians, loneliness and ills 

Failed to dishearten them. 

Their tiny village boasted soon a spire 
Pointing to God, whose blessings all acclaimed; 
While at the village school their chilrden learned 
What must be learned by humble men and famed. 
Here the nucleus appeared 
Portentous of greatness. 

Thus, through a hundred years the steady growth 

Of what is now DeKalb in Illinois 

Progressed; offering to all its plenitude 

Of education, business, homes and civic poise; 

And girdled by thriving farms 

Whose people share its blessings. 

DeKalb, a city, proudly celebrates 

Its hundreth birthday. Every native son 

Is summoned to share the pageantry 

Depicting growth augmented by each one. 

As joyously we celebi'ate, we too 

Most humbly thank our God. 



Page 2 




izinof the County along with Boone County and 
Stephenson County, and while those latter two 
names were specifically mentioned and the rea- 
sons Kiven for their selection, there was no rea- 
son given for the selection of the name DeKalb 
for this area. 

Early Settlers 

The first settlers came to this area in North- 
ern Illinois following the Blackhawk War of 
1832 which erased forever the Indian menace 
to this area. They came straggling in at first 
but as the settlement of Chicago grew and the 
pressure on the East increased, they soon 
streamed in here in increasing numbers. 

Their main interest in the area was the tim- 
berland. The timber held for them their build- 
ing materials, their food and their fuel. They 
did not have any intere.st in the prairie, which 
to them was useless. They were not primarily 
fai-mers — they were settlers. 



JA:®©^ VDIE 



■-\d^&. 



/^It...^ 



c(-^i-i^n^ ^' 



'/■{h^ 



Courtesy of Chicago Historical Society 

Our Town 

DeKalb is named for Baron Johann DeKalb 
who was born in Germany and served in the 
German and French army. He was an adven- 
turer and shifted his allegiance from one 
country to another always seeking higher rank. 
He was always interested in military affairs 
and soon rose to a general's rank in the French 
army. 

He came to the colonies to support George 
Washington and the colonial cause, and became 
a major general in the army of the revolution. 
He was second in command at the battle of 
Camden, fought on August 16, 1870, and at that 
battle he was wounded severely while protect- 
ing the retreat of the main army. He was 
taken pri.soner by the British and died August 
19, 1780. 

When this settlement was made, it was first 
called Huntley's Grove: the first official name 
was DeKalb Center after the Po.st Office. 

The town itself takes its name from the 
County, which was formed in 1837. The county 
was named in the legislative enactment organ- 



When they arrived, they found that the tim- 
ber, or woodlands, followed the rivers. This 
was particularly true in the area near DeKalb, 
and in the northwestern part of DeKalb County 
where the timber followed the Kishwaukee 
River. It is said that there were no trees be- 
tween the south end of Huntley's Grove, which 
is DeKalb, and Pritchard's Grove ten miles 
south, which is now Waterman. 

It was the intention of the early settlers to 
build mills and to lay out towns and to reap 
the financial benefits therefrom. They found 
the timber all right, but when they came to 
build their mills on the Kishwaukee River they 
found that even then the water was too low and 
the stream was too unreliable to make milling 
a profitable venture. In fact, one of the early 
accounts of DeKalb Township speaks of a town 
which was laid out north of DeKalb about the 
vicinity of what we call the Nelson farm today, 
but that was given up due to the failure of the 
Kishwaukee to supply power enough to turn 
the mill wheels of the proposed mill at that 
point. 

It was Russell Huntley, who came and settled 
in the timber further .south, that really started 
this town of DeKalb. Russell Huntley can be 
rightly called the Father of DeKalb; in fact, 
the south end of the grove in which he settled 
in those early days soon became known as 
Huntley's Grove and you will find it referred to 
by that name in several of the histories. 

Huntley came from Vermont. He was repre- 
senting Eastern capitalists who wanted to buy 
timber and build a mill, and some people say 
it was his prime intention to lay out a town. 

Page 3 



Huntley's first venture in this area of Hunt- 
ley's Grove, was the building of a hotel, or as 
it was called in those days — a tavern. This 
tavern was located on the northwest corner of 
what is now First and Lincoln Highway, or the 
site of the Elks' Club. It is very fitting that 
the Centennial Building, the offices of the 
DeKalb Centennial, has been built almost upon 
the spot where the Russell Huntlev Tavern was 
built in 1838. 

This tavern was patronized by the teamsters 
who were hauling grain from Dixon's Ferry, 
which is now Di.xon, Illinois, to Chicago. If 
you will note on the map, DeKalb is just about 
half way between Chicago and Dixon. 

Huntley Hotel, or Tavern, was described as 
a double log house. It probably was not very 
commodious, and the teamsters being quite 
numerous, there was necessity for some of them 
at times to sleep in the stable. There must 
have been some fear of profiteering in tho.se 
days as the newly formed DeKalb County, 
thi-ough its commissioners, set the rates which 
Russell Huntley and others could charge for 
meals and lodging in their hotels or taverns. 
These rates look peculiar to us today. For ex- 
ample, thirty-one cents for lodging for one 
night for a man ; twelve and one-half cents for 
meals; and twelve and one-half cents for hay 
for a horse over night, and seventy-five cents 
per bushel for oats was all he could charge. 

Huntley sold his hotel in 1846 and immedi- 
ately built a newer one which he called the 
Eagle Hotel on the corner of Second and Lin- 
coln Highway, the site of which is now occu- 
pied by the First National Bank. This hotel 
was in three parts, according to the descrip- 
tions left to us; the west wing, was a kitchen: 
the east wing was a bar room, and the center 
part contained a dining room and two bed- 
rooms. There were two bedrooms on the sec- 
ond floor, but again the accommodations were 
not adequate for the teamsters, and it is said 
that many of them at times had to sleep in the 
stable nearby. 

The Eagle Hotel stood on this site for a good 
many years, and in the late years of the 19th 
century was moved. Part of the Hotel is still 
in existence as part of the Arlington Hotel on 
Ea.st Lincoln Highway just east of Fourth Street 
in DeKalb today. 

As the settlement grew around Huntley's 
Tavern and the Eagle Hotel, Russell Huntley 
took steps to purchase from the United States 
Government the land on which his settlement 
stood. On April 9, 1844, he purchased eighty 
acres of land. Four days later, April 13, 1844, 
Steven S. Jones purchased eighty acres immedi- 
ately to the East of the Huntley purchase. 
Then, on April 30, 1846, a little over two years 
later, Russell Huntley purchased from Jones 
his eighty acres, making Huntley the owner of 
one hundred sixty acres, or a greater share of 
the land on which DeKalb stands today. 



W. M. DUNN CO. 

Member 
MIDWEST STOCK EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE 

^-^■^ 

Correspondent o/ 
LAMSON BROS. & CO. 

Members 
Of All Principal Exchanges 



WAYNE C. BENSON 
Managing Partner 



STOCKS, BONDS 
INVESTMENT CO. 
COMMODITIES 
CASH GRAIN 



131 V2 E. LINCOLN HWY. 
DEKALB, ILLINOIS 
PHONE: 
6-4888 



/( started as — 

ELVIN CARLSON'S CLOTHING STORE 

Then it was — 

DAVIS MEN'S WEAR 

and back to — 

ELVIN CARLSON'S CLOTHING STORE 

and now it's 

JOLLY'S TOGGERY 

for 

SMART MEN'S WEAR 
IN DE KALB 



Page 4 



M & M PHARMACY 

Wm. M. Mercer, R. Ph. G. H. McGinty, R. Ph. 



WHERE PHARMACY 

IS A 

PROFESSION 



Phone 6-5873 



GORDON HARDWARE 

514 East Lincoln Highway 
The Home of Name Brands 

AMANA . . . CROSLEY . . . NORGE 
WHIRLPOOL . . . YOUNGSTOWN 



Indians 

The Indians in this area were the Pottowato- 
mies, and the most famous and influential of 
them, Shabbona, who was an Ottawa chief 
by birth and a Pottowatomie chief by marriage, 
wielded a great influence among the various 
tribes. 

He became convinced that the Indians could 
not stop the onrush of the whites and did all 
in his power to protect them. During the 
Blackhawk War of 1832, Shabbona made two 
midnight rides to warn settlers of impeding 
danger. Afterwards he was given a grove for 
his services. 

The grove was lost to him by a misunder- 
standing but is today one of DeKaib County's 
forest preserves. In his journeys from his home 
to Lake Geneva, he took a trail which crossed 
the campus of Northern Illinois State College. 
This trail is marked by bent trees, some of 
which are still standing. 

Organization Of The Village 

The village of DeKaib was organized in 1856 
as a village under the general act of the legis- 
lature of the State of Illinois. No specific date 
for this action has been determined, although 
the records at Springfield and at Sycamore 
have been searched carefully. It is this par- 
ticular act of the people of this community that 
we are celebrating today — the Centennial — 
of the incorporation of the community as a vil- 
lage. 

The incorporation charter of the village of 
DeKaib was amended by specific acts of the 
Legislature in 1861 when it was changed slight- 
ly to permit the president of the board of 
trustees to be a member of the county board of 
supervisors, and then in 1868 when other 
changes were made in the corporation of the 
town charter. 

The town continued to operate under a vil- 
lage form of government until February, 1877, 
when, by a vote of the people it became a city. 



WISDOM TRUCKING SERVICE 

TRANSFER 
GENERAL TRUCKING 



Local Moving . . . Long Distance 
1328 N. 14th St. DeKaib G-673I 




First Picture of Main Street DeKaib - 1860 



Page 5 




East Plant or Tne American Sreel and W 



Barbed Wire 

When the settlers came to northern Illinois 
they found that the fencing material which 
they were accustomed to use was not to be had. 
No stone was available and, although obtain- 
able, timber for wooden fences was hard to 
manufacture. The smooth wire in use was not 
satisfactory as it was apt to break in cold wea- 
therfi and, too, it would not turn stock. 

Several attempts were made to produce a 
fence with thorns to deter the stock, but none 
proved practical. Jacob Haish at one time 
conceived the notion of weaving Osage Orange 
branches in wood and wire fences in an effort 
to turn the stock. At one time he even sold 
Osage seed for $5.00 per pound. His project 
was not satisfactory and was dropped. 

I. L. Ellwood once told that he and Joseph 
Glidden became interested in the idea of in- 
venting a barbed fence. While attending the 
DeKalb Agricultural Fair they noticed the ex- 
hibit of William Rose of Waterman. The dis- 
play showed his patent consisting of a square 



piece of wood .studded with brads which could 
be hung on a wire or wood fence. The device 
was found effective, but not practical. 

:\Ir. Glidden started to work on his plan for 
a barbed wire in the spring of 1873 in the front 
yard of his house on West Lincoln Highway. 
He took some short pieces of wire, twisted 
them around a smooth wire, and then twisted 
another wire to the first. In working on this 
invention he fastened the wires to a tree and 
used a grindstone for the twisting. For cutting 
the barbs he rigged up a coffee mill. In Octo- 
ber, 1873, he applied for a patent, but it was 
not granted until November 24. 1874. 

After Mr. Glidden's patent had been grant- 
ed, Mr. Ellwood, who had also obtained a pat- 
ent of his own, decided that Mr. Glidden's de- 
sign was better than his and purchased for 
$265.00 a half interest in the Glidden patent. 

The two men formed the Barb Fence Com- 



Page 6 



*^ 



? 

f 

*• 

¥ 

I 




* <>I^ **" "'^ ^* ^"^ •* •* ^*^ ^''^ ^^'^ ^*^ ^'"^ ^ti^ •7?'^?j?' ^.t^ 'Jy 

V|V 

I 
I 

•tfi 



Early DeKalb Firsts 

FIRST WHITE SETTLERS in the spring of 1835 : John B. Codins and Norman 
C. Moore. 

FIRST HOTEL built in February 1837 by Russell Huntley (which structure also 
housed the first postoffice). 

RRST TOWNSHIP SCHOOL held in 1838 in a ColtonviUe loghouse. 

FIRST SCHOOLHOUSE built in 1850: First teacher. Jonathan Stone. 

HRST CHURCH SOCIETY (the Baptist) in 1842. 

FIRST MARRIAGE: J. M. Goodell to Caroline F. Bathrick. 

RRST BUCKSMITH SHOP built by Abial Richardson. 

HRST JUSTICE OF THE PEACE: C. Morey. elected in 1853. 

FIRST RAILROAD: The Chicago & North Western 

in 1853. 

• 

FIRST GRIST MILL in 1 853 : run by a man named 
Brooks. 

HRST LUMBERYARD in 1854 started by Walker Bent. 

FIRST WAREHOUSE in 1854 belonging to Butts & Richardson. 

FIRST WAGON & REPAIR SHOP in 1855 owned by Smith D. Baldwin 

HRST DRUGSTORE in 1850 by Dr. Basil Rudy. 




m 



PUBLIC 



SERVICE 



COMPANY 






^f 



Page 7 




YOUR CITY 
Is Serving Its Citizens 

• • • 

Progressive DeKalb City Administrations of the past 
100 years are responsible for the many municipal 
services today's citizens enjoy. We are all indebted 
to these many civic minded pioneers. As we look 
about our city, we see their works and have come 
to appreciate their good judgment. 

And now, because of the foresight of these men, 
DeKalb has paved streets, adequate water supply, 
sewage disposal system, fine street lighting, fire 
protection, police protection, public library, muni- 
cipal hospital, city parks and playgrounds and 
many other public services. 

So, on this Cenfennial year, we pay fribufe 
to the early builders of our city. 

ALL DEPARTMENTS OF 
DEKALB CITY ADMINISTRATION 



Page 








„irfiT|l!n!H!J]^ - - - 
.ii<iWii|!ii|ll!!|{| \ tt 



^m 




West Mill (Red Shops) American Steel and Wire Company, from Sixth Street 



pany and made a few rods in the Glidden barn 
during the winter of 1875-76. The next spring 
they moved into a small building on Main 
Street, now the site of the Elsa Gift Shop, 
where they started to manufacture wire on a 
larger scale. 

The method followed was unique and crude. 
Two workmen would climb the windmill tower 
standing on the northeast corner of Second and 
Main (Lincoln Highway) w'ith one end of a 
long greased wire and a pail of barbs. The 
other end of the wire extended into the factory. 
They would slide the barbs down this greased 
wire and clamped them on by hand in the 
factory. Then a second wire would be twisted 
on to the first by horse power. One hundred 
pounds of wire per day was good production. 

The next winter they built a factory on Sec- 
ond Street across from the City Hall, and with 
machines designed and built by blacksmith 
Phin Vaughan, the output reached seven tons 
per day. 

Jacob Haish, in the meantime, was working 
in his carpenter's shop on East Main (Lincoln 
Highway). Here he developed his "S" barb 



and began production by using machines de- 
veloped by himself. As cirly as 1873 he was 
shipping v.irc to the Pacific Coast. 

The demand for wire from DeKalb caused 
Mr. Charles Washburne, of the firm of Wash- 
l urne and Moen in Worchester. Massachusetts, 
to visit DeKalb. He first visited Mr. Haish, 
who offered to sell for $200,000. He later said 
he expected Mr. Washburne to make a counter 
offer. 

Later Washburne called on Glidden and Ell- 
wood and purchased the Glidden patent for 
$60,000 and a royalty of 25 cents per 100 
pounds of wire. 

Washburne and Moen and Ellwood formed 
the L L. Ellwood manufacturing Company and 
began to purchase all of the basic barb wire 
patents. They could not buy Mr. Haish's and 
.sued him and six others for patent infringment. 
The District Court for Northern Illinois decided 
the case in favor of the Glidden-Ellwood in- 
terests on December 15, 1880. 

This litigation was settled on a basis of Mr. 
Haish's paying the Ellwood Company 75 cents 

Page 9 



per 100 pounds of barbed wire he had made 
and the Ellwood Company's paying him the 
same for the use of the Haish patented ma- 
chines. 

The Ellwood Company built the Red Shops 
on the northeast corner of Fourth and Locust 
Streets and a new company, the Superior Barb- 
ed Wire Company, occupied the old Second 
Street building. Later they built a wire draw- 
ing plant on Tenth Street. 

On March 18, 1898. L L. Ellwood. John W. 
Gates, and others formed the American Steel 
and Wire Company. The two plants in DeKalb 
were a part of the company and later it ac- 
quired two more plants. 

Barbed wire and kindred steel products were 
made in DeKalb until May. 1938, when the 
American Steel and Wire Company moved to 
Joliet and Waukegan. 



TILL 



s 

■^J DE KALB, nXINOIS ^^ 
EVERY INCH A DRUG STORE 



DIAL 6-34 1 G 
THANK YOU 



GENERAL SHEET METAL SHOP 

General Electric Heating and Air Conditioning 

Quality Workmanship and Merchandise 



Marsh Harvester 

Another agricultural invention to come out 
of DeKalb was the Marsh Harvester. This 
was the work of two brothers, C. W. and W. 
W. Marsh. 

While working with a Mann Reaper they 
noticed how the gavels of grain fell into the 
box to be bound, but as they fell off the reaper 
they scattered. 

About 1858 these two men with the help of 
a local machinist tore apart a Mann Reaper, 
added parts from a scrap pile and put into the 
field the first harvester. After a year of trial 
they began manufacturing this machine in 
Sycamore and Piano and found the results 
good. They soon started to work on improve- 
ments and developed an automatic knotter 
for the sheaves. 

Due to faulty materials used by suppliers 
they had manufacturing difficulties and when 
they lost a court decision on the patent they 
discontinued their work. 

Before they left the field, C. W. Marsh had 
demonstrated his machine in several European 
countries. 



Service Is Our Business 
116 S. 7th Street /flJiJift Phone 6-4221 




THE RITCHIES 

DEKALB NEWS STAND 

"By The Clock" 



HERB NELSON & CO 

860 North Seventh Street 
DIAL 6-5412 DEKALB 



C. W. Marsh's home was the building now 
used as a nurses home by the DeKalb County 
Tuberculosis Sanatorium. Here he indulged in 
his liking for animals and gathered together 
several wild animals in the park surrounding 
the home. Among these was a herd of deer 
which was well known in Northern Hlinois. 

Page 10 



EXCAVATING DUMP TRUCK 

CRANE WORK .... BULLDOZER .... MOVING 




Aerial View of N. I. S. C. 



Northern Illinois State College 

It was 1892, the year that Edgar Duryea 
made the first American automobile, and a 
novel idea was forming itself in the mind of 
Clinton Rosette. This strong-minded man, the 
outspoken editor of the Democratic DeKalb 
Daily Chronicle, had used his influence to se- 
cure the election of John P. Altgeld as governor 
of Illinois, and Altgeld had asked what position 
he might offer Rosette in return. The editor's 
first reply was that he already had a job — 
but then he thought of his idea: why should 
northern Illinois not have a state normal school 
comparable to those at Normal in the central 
part of the state, and at Carbondale in south- 
ern Illinois? And so Rosette requested that 



he be appointed to the Board of Trustees of 
the Normal Schools of Illinois in order to pro- 
mote the establishment of a college for teachers 
at DeKalb. 

Shrewdly joining forces with Isaac L. Ell- 
wood, the local Republican leader in DeKalb, 
and other prominent citizens. Rosette led in the 
drafting of a bill which asked the state legis- 
lature to appropriate $100,000 for a building 
and to appoint a board of trustees of five mem- 
bers. As for the location of the school, the bill 
left little to chance: ". . . said school is to be 
located as near as may be midway between 
Lake Michigan and the Mississippi river east 
and west, and as near as may be half-way be- 
tween the Wisconsin line and the Rock Island 
Railway." DeKalb was neatly pinpointed! 

Page 11 



SKORBERG'S 
FURNITURE STORE 

Corner of Fourth and Lincoln Highway 
DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



DeKalb Counties Furniture Center 

FURNITURE - CABPETS - BEDDING 

— APPLIANCES — 



PHONE 6-4111 



PHONE G-4111 




Clinton Rosetfe, founder of Northern Illinois State College 



SULLIVAN'S DRIVE IN 

LIQUORS and TAVERN 

SULLY SR. SULLY JR. 

722 East Lincoln Highway 



NO WAITING... 

JUST PULL UP TO SIDE DOOR AND GIVE 
YOUR PACKAGE ORDER THROUGH OUR 
NEW INTERCOM SYSTEM. 



WE DELIVER 



Page 12 



PHONE G-4323 



Rosette's bill, sponsored by State Senator D. 
D. Hunt of DeKalb, immediately ran into com- 
petition with a similar bill being advanced by a 
group in the eastern part of the state. After 
some maneuvering, both groups agreed to sup- 
port each other, and both bills were passed. 
The $100,000, however, was divided between 
the two schools. This did not provide enough 
for buildings and equipment for either school, 
even at "gay nineties" prices; so it was decid- 
ed to secure sites and plans and then, two 
years later, ask for enough money for both 
plants. As a result, both schools were fully 
financed by the legislature in 1895. 

By now several cities in northern Illinois 
were on the scent: Rockford, Freeport, Polo 
and Dixon all fancied themselves as centers of 
higher learning and presented their attractions 
to the .state board. But Rosette and Ellwood 
very skillfully planned the tour of inspection 
which the board was requested to make. In 
the middle of a hot and dry week in August 
the board was taken to Rockford, where the 



Rock River and beauties of the city were of- 
fered as attractions. Then came the turns of 
Freeport, Polo, and Dixon to make the most of 
their opportunity. Dixon's case was particu- 
larly strong, for their delegation offered to give 
the buildings and grounds of a private normal 
school without cost to the state if the new- 
school were located there. 



By the time these inspections were made, 
Friday night had come. Because of the heat, 
Ellwood suggested that the board rest over the 
weekend and resume the inspection in DeKalb 
on the following Monday. That night a heavy 
rain broke the hot spell, filled the Kishwaukee 
to overflowing, and made a beautiful lake of 
the swampy segment of the proposed site. The 
visiting board was delighted with what they 
found, particularlv when they heard the terms 
of DeKalb's offer! 



About seventy acres at the northwest edge 
of town were to be donated by Joseph Glidden. 
As additional inducements the city of DeKalb 
promised to pave the main street (now West 
Lincoln Highway) as far as the south entrance 
of the campus. The city schools were offered 
as facilities for practice teaching, in keeping 
with the plan for training teachers which Dr. 
John W. Cook advocated. Cook, then presi- 
dent of the State Normal University of Normal, 
Illinois, had indicated that he would accept 
the presidency of the new school. Another 
DeKalb leader, Jacob Haish. promised to give 
$10,000 for a library for the school, and Ell- 
wood promised $30,000 in cash. 

Nothing further was needed. The board 
agreed to locate the new school in DeKalb. 

At the laying of the corner stone of the new 
building on October 1, 1895, Governor Altgeld 
was the principal speaker; music was furnished 
by the famous Pullman Military Band, the 
Schumann Ladies Quartet, and the DeKalb 
Choral Society; and the Grand Lodge of the 
Order of Free and Accepted Masons, in session 
in Chicago, adjourned and came out by special 
train to see that the stone was duly set. 



The first session of the Northern Illinois 
State Normal School opened on September 12, 
1899, when 139 students and 16 faculty mem- 
bers met at 8:00 a.m. in the study hall (now 
the student lounge) for opening exercises. 
Classes were conducted in the building in spite 
of the hammering and the noise of workmen 
polishing the mosaic corridor floors. Sidewalks 
leading to the building on what is now College 
Avenue, consisted of wooden planks laid end 
to end, and students crossed the "Kish" on a 
plank footbridge with wooden handrails. 



"where smarf young women shop" 
the 

eleanore shop 

in the heart of dekalb 
corner of 3rd and lincoln highway 

dekalb, III. 



A FANFARE TO DEKALB! 

From 

THE WLBK STAFF 

It's a wonderful event for DeKalb to celebrate a 
century of growth and accomplishment. WLBK — 
Your Community Radio Station — is proud to have 
provided this fine city and its surrounding area with 
local news and sports, public service, entertainment, 
children's programs and farm and home service for 

nearly nine years As DeKalb enters its second 

century — we pledge ourselves to make Radio — the 
Universal Medium — of still greater service to the 
men, women and children who live, work and play 
in the Barb City and on the farms and in the towns 
and cities within its orbit. 



1360 on Your XXTf "DT/" 1360 on Your 

Radio Dial W LiOXV Radio Dial 

DE K ALB 

"For Good Family Listening All Day Long." 



Page 13 



The City of DeKalb celebrated the opening 
of its new school with a hup:e dedication cere- 
mony known as the Crimson Days. From Sep- 
tember 21st through the 23rd thousands of 
people from all parts of northern Illinois brav- 
ed torrents of rain to flock to DeKalb for the 
festival parades, balls and dances, street car- 
nivals, and speech making. Appropriately, the 
daughter of Mr. Ellwood, Mrs. Jessie Elhvood 
Ray (now Mrs. Sherman G. Bonney of DeKalb) 
was chosen Queen of Crimson Days. Again the 
governor, this time John R. Tanner, honored 
DeKalb with his presence, as did such other 
notables as President Draper of the University 
of Illinois. Superintendent Bright of Cook 
County. Charles E. Brush and W. J. McAlpine 
(architects and contractor, respectively), and 
the Board of Trustees. 



Northern Illinois State College in its more 
than half century of service to state and 
country has known a variety of titles. The 
somewhat unwieldy name of the early years. 
Northern Illinois State Normal School, gave 
way in 1921 to the equally long but more up- 
to-date title of Northern Illinois State Teachers 
College, and finally, in July 1955, to Northern 
Illinois State College. Since 1921 two-year 
and four-year curricula have been offered to 
prepare teachers for elementary and high 
school teaching. The awarding of a diploma 
for completion of the two-year curriculum was 
discontinued in 1943. Graduates of the four- 
year program now receive the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science in Education, Bachelor of Science 
or Bachelor of Arts, depending on the curricu- 
lum followed. Since 1952 the college has also 
awarded the degree of Master of Science in 
Education. 

The early years of Northern present a record 
of slow but continuous expansion. On the fifth 
anniversai-y of its founding there were nearly 
300 men and women enrolled, on the tenth an- 
niversary nearly 500. The years of World 
War I brought a decrease of over fifty percent 
in student enrollment, but the number climbed 
.steadily again after the war, and ranged close 
to the 700 mark until 1938, when Northern 
found over 900 .students crowding its campus. 
After the decrease during the years of World 
War II. Northern's enrollment again began a 
steady rise that has taken it from 1442 in 1946 
to 3203 for the spring semester of 1956. There 
has been a corresponding increase in facultv, 
of course: 30 in 1906, 54 in 1916. 82 in 1946. 
and 212 this Centennial year! If the annual in- 
crease continues to be about 400 (the average 
increase for the last four years). Northern's 
enrollment for 1960 will be 5360 — and it may 
well be considerably more. 

And so Northern looks to the future. Five 
buildings sufficed the college until 1940: nine 



MONTGOMERY WARD 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to 

De Kalb 

for 100 Years of 

Continued Growth and 

Progress 



JOHNSON and JACOBSON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 



213 NORTH 7th STREET 

TELEPHONE 6-5932 

DE KALB, ILLINOIS 



Page 14 



BEST WISHES 

DE KALB 

ON YOUR CENTENNIAL 

COREY & EVANS, INC. 

117 North 7th Street 
DE KALB ILLINOIS 

Phone 6-4831 



have been built since that time, three of them 
since 1952. But this is only a beginning. Three 
new campuses have been developed to accomo- 
date the growing needs of the college ; North 
Campus (acquired subsequent to 1946) com- 
prises 100 acres north of Lucinda Avenue and 
east of Garden Road and provided facilities for 
golfing and other recreational and athletic 
activities. West Campus, a tract lying one 
block west of the main campus, was acquired 
by the college in 1949 and extended in the 
spring of the present year by the purchase of 
131 acres west of Annie Glidden Road. And 
the Lorado Taft Field Campus, situated in the 
hilly and heavily-wooded area along the Rock 
River near the city of Oregon (some thirty-five 
miles west of DeKalb), was acquired in 1951 
as a center for outdoor education. Soon a new 
classroom building will join Neptune Hall, the 
fir.st building on the West Campus; and this 
year may see the completion of work on an- 
other We.st-Campus building, a new field house 
to seat 5000 Huskie fans. Many additional 
units are projected for the years immediately 
ahead — a new laboratory school, new class- 
room buildings, dormitories, faculty hou.sing 
units, a Student Union, a health center, and a 
central power plant, as well as additions to ex- 
isting buildings. 

The faculty and admini.stration of Northern 
Illinois State College view the coming period 
of rapid nationwide educational expansion and 
the next century of DeKalb history as an oppor- 
tunity to give further — and better — educa- 
tional service to the people of the State of Ill- 
inois. 



THE 
ELSA GIFT SHOP 

DE KALB, ILLINOIS 





Ui-i 






East School located at Lincoln Highway and 11 th Street 
in 1899 



Page 15 




ELKS LODGE 

Has Grown With DeKalb 

SINCE 1902 

Chartered August 14, 1902 Membership 33 

On August 14, 1955 Membership 814 

• • • 

Since 1902 This Lodge — 

its principles and teachings, through its members of all 
walks of life, has held an active part in the development 
and betterment of this community. 

We pledge a never ceasing, driving fight to combat any 
force which seeks to subvert our — "American Way." 

GROWING THROUGH THE CENTURY WITH DEKALB 

MUSIC AND DANCING NIGHTLY 
LUNCH and DINNER SERVED DAILY DURING CENTENNIAL 

• • • 

VISITORS WELCOME 

B.P. O.E. ELKS 
No. 765 



Justice 



Charity 



Brotherly Love 



Fidelity 



Page 16 



One Hundred Years In 
DeKalb Schools 

When the little village of DeKalb in Orange 
township was founded, and the settlers had 
time to think of other things than the bare nec- 
essities of life, the need of a schoolhouse be- 
came imperative. The first building was not 
an elaborate structure. It was built of logs and 
roofed with "shakes" (boards from two to three 
feet long and about a half-inch thick) ; it had 
no floor and no windows — simply openings 
made in the sides; consequently, when it be- 
came cold enough to need a fire, school was 
discontinued until it became warm again. There 
were only three or four desks, placed in front 
for the pupils who took writing. The seats 
were made of logs, sawed lengthwise down the 
middle, leaving one flat side; on the other side 
holes were bored and legs inserted. They 
could thus accommodate fifteen or twenty pup- 
ils. This schoolhouse was on First Street, 
about half-way between Curler Street and the 
railroad tracks (the railroad came later). 

Soon the need of a better building was felt, 
and about 1850 another school-house was erec- 
ted on Franklin Street, between First and Sec- 
ond. Here Jonathan Stone taught a term of 
school at a salary of $16 per month, teaching 
alternately five and six days a week. The sal- 
ary of the teacher was raised by subscription. 
Thus began the educational history of DeKalb. 

As soon as the village was platted (1853), 
steps were taken for the erection of a better 
building. A small tax was levied and the school 
was built on the site of the old Congregational 
Church, on the corner of Grove and Second 
Streets. As there was not enough money rais- 
ed by this taxation to complete the structure, 
a couple of dances were given to secure the 
remainder of the sum needed. Timothy J. 
Lyon was the first teacher here. 

As the village increased in numbers, this 
building soon became too small; so in 1855 an- 
other school was erected across the street from 
the Catholic church. It was here that the 
grade which corresponds most nearly with our 
present high school was formed. This was 
called the Seminary. 

By the end of four years, this building had 
also become too small to accommodate the 
large number of pupils, and it was therefore 
sold and moved back from the corner to the 
middle of the block, where it was made into a 
dwelling. 

In 1861 a brick building was built at the 
corner of Third and Prospect Streets. For 
many years this was the finest common school 



Congratulations, DeKalb, 
On Your Centennial! 



SUPERIOR SALES & SERVICE. Inc. 

AGENTS FOR 

NORTH AMERICAN 
VAN LINES 

DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



Household Moving 



6-6731 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to 

DeKalb 

from 

WHITE OWL CIGARS 

AND 

WALTER C. KNAAK, Distributor 

DIXON, ILLINOIS 



Page 17 



CENTENNIA 
GREETINGS 

"Part of DeKalb for % of a Century" 
"A MODERN LAUNDRY 
You Leave It SERVING DEKALB 

SINCE 1890" 



We Do It 



WHITE ROSE LAUNDRY 



Member of The American Institute o( Laundering 



127 SOUTH FIFTH ST. 



DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



buildinK of any town of its size in the state. At 
first the third story was not finished, as there 
was no need for it. 

The first principal at this building was C. 
Warner. After him came M. Andrews. J. A. 
Mabie, E. L. Wells. T. W. Dodge, and A. Wells, 
each of whom taught a year, with the exception 
of the last two. Then followed Curtis and 
Crandall. the latter remaining three years. 

Under Miss Ella L. Dunbar the High School 
reached a higher standard of excellence than 
it ever had before or for many years after- 
wards. Miss Dunbar was energetic, progres- 
sive and very capable of filling her position. 
She maintained a strict discipline, taking 
charge of the children from the time they left 
their homes until they returned. She was the 
first principal who ever attempted to have a 
graduating class; she took charge of the 
schools in 1870, and in 1874 she graduated a 
class of four. 

In 1874 a new North Side grade school was 
built. The building is now occupied by the 
DeKalb Agricultural Association. 

In 1888 John T. Bowles became superinten- 
dent and under him many improvements were 
instituted. 



Miss Lucy H. Carson was the first regular 
High School principal, and through her efforts 
and those of Mr. Bowles, the High School was 
placed upon the accredited lists of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois and of Southern Illinois Normal 
School. The courses were steadily increasing 
in number, and in 1894 an addition was built 
to the South Side school building, and a new 
East Side school was built. 

Mr. Bowles was the first one to have music 
systematically taught in the schools. 

In 1896 H. F. Derr was made superintendent 
of schools. He instituted the half year promo- 
tions and the four-year course in the High 
School. The High School principals during this 
time were .Joseph Grey. S. F. Parson, and Miss 
Martha L. Pond. 

The year 1899 ushered in the best and most 
prosperous period in the existence of the High 
School. Newell D. Gilbert became superinten- 
dent of schools and Charles Everett Skinner 
principal of the High School. Under their di- 
rection the High School advanced until it was 
in 1902 upon the accredited lists of five uni- 
versities with liberal courses of study and boast- 



Page 18 




North School, North Fifth Street, in 1897 



ed a corps of nine teachers and a roll of two 
hundred students. 

It was In January 1902, that the South Side 
School was destroyed by fire. Following the 
fire, high school classes were conducted in the 
Northern Illinois State Normal. 

In 1903, a board of six members and a fac- 
ulty of ten started work in the new DeKalb 
Township high school building, which had co.st 
$50,000. 

In 1903-1904, bonds for $30,000 each were 
voted for two new grade schools later named 
Glidden and Haish after DeKalb's two illus- 
trious citizens. 

In 1908-1909, another $30,000 was voted for 
the erection of Ellwood School. 

In 1909, the first caps and gowns were pur- 
chased for a high school graduating class of 
46 members. 

When 1911 came along, a new superinten- 
dent of city schools, Luther Hatch, had to be 
hired. Later city school superintendents in- 
cluded F. R. Ritzman and Frank Phillips. 

In 1913, St. Mary's Grade School was built. 

C. W. Whitten took over the principal's job 
of the high school in 1916, and one of his main 
pro.iects was in the music department, where 



CONGRATULATIONS 



MILK 

BUTTERMILK 

GRAPEFRUIT 



ORANGE 
BUTTER 
COTTAGE CHEESE 



HEY BROS. ICE CREAM 

ICE CREAM 

CONES . . . BARS . . . SUNDAES 

MALTED MILKS 

COMPLETE CARRY OUT SERVICE 



Milk Consumers' Association 

-IN BUSINESS FOR YOUR HEALTH'' 



DIAL DEKALB G-4312 
1132 PLEASANT 



DE KALB 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CITY OF DE KALB 

O N I T S 

100th BIRTHDAY 



CANTEEN SERVICE 



Page 19 



music appreciation was first taught. 

With World War I coming up in 1917, the 
call to service came to a number of the high 
school students. During the years 1917-1918, 
111 alumni and students were listed on the ser- 
vice men's honor roll. 

A new principal, R. G. Beals, came to De- 
Kalb in 1922, replacing C. W. Whitten, who 
became head of the Illinois High School Associ- 
ation. 

Members of the present staff working at the 
high school in 1924, were principal Mr. E. O. 
Hoppe, Mi.ss Edith Wentworth, and Mr. Paul 
Furr. 

Other current teachers. Miss Gertrude Ady, 
and Mr. Merlin Raddatz arrived in 1924-1925. 

A $265,000 addition was added to the high 
school in 1923. This included a swimming pool, 
athletic quarters for both girls and boys, wood- 
working shop, auditorium, homemaking quar- 
ters, art studio, cafeteria, business department, 
business offices, a library — now used as a 
social room, projection room, and a little thea- 
ter — and additional classrooms. 

Student teachers first arrived at DTHS from 
Northern Illinois State Teachers College in 
1937. and are still coming in each semester for 
their practice teaching. 

World War II brought changes in the De- 
Kalb school system, such as the drafting of 
several teachers, and War Bond Sales which be- 
came a regularly scheduled activity. Forty 
alumni or students gave their lives for their 
country. One thousand forty-six served their 
country. 

In 1943 Superintendent S. B. Sullivan took 
over the job previously occupied by R. G. Beals. 

In 1948, Margaret Wiltberger, secretary to 
the superintendent of the grade schools retired 
after over 40 years of service in the DeKalb 
School System. Since then a scholarship has 
been set up by the Business and Profe.ssional 
Women's Club of DeKalb in memory of Miss 
Wiltberger, who died le.ss than a year after her 
retirement. The following year W. T. Emery, 
of the science department, retired after fifty 
years of teaching, 46 of which were spent in 
DeKalb. In 1950-51 all-purpose rooms were 
added to the two grade schools. Glidden and 
EUwood. 

From 1904 until July 1, 1954, the public 
school sy.stem was a dual system, with separ- 
ate districts for elementary and high school 
pupils. As of that date, the districts were 
combined with the Coltonville, Love, and Cort- 

I Continued on Page 22) 



Compliments of 
All Union Barber Shops 

SANITARY BARBER SHOP 
HANK'S BARBER SHOP 
GEORGE LOCK'S BARBER SHOP 
NELSON'S BARBER SHOP 
OLSON'S BARBER SHOP 
WILLIAM PEURA'S BARBER SHOP 
BRUNO SODOUSKI'S BARBER SHOP 
FIRST STREET BARBER SHOP 
BOB'S BARBER SHOP 

BARBER'S LOCAL 874 

D E K A L B 



Get the 

BEST 

Get 



ICE CREAM 



Page 20 



Millonte 



FOOD 
PRODUCTS 



As a Company and as part of this community, we welcome 
the opportunity to participate in DeKalb's Centennial. We are 
proud of the part we have played in the progress of this com- 
munity. 

In 1926, California Packing Corporation seeking increased 
vegetable canning facilities m the Middle West, built the DeKalb 
plant and their products became part of the "Del Monte" Line. 

Since that time the Midwest Division of the California Pack- 
ing Corporation has had a continued and steady growth. It is 
our hope and plan that this growth will continue into the future. 

We acknowledge gratefully the splendid part which the 
people of this community have played and are playing in the 
"Del Monte" success story. 



CALIFORNIA PACKING CORPORATION 

MIDWEST DIVISION 
DeKalb, Illinois 



Page 21 




South School, Third and Prospect Sts., before the fire 

land Districts to form Community Unit District 
No. 428. 

The governing body of the school district is 
the Board of Education, an elected group of 
seven members, no more than five of whom 
may be elected from any incorporated village 
or town. Any legal voter of the school district 
may become a candidate for membership on 
the board upon filing with the secretary of the 
board a petition properly signed by fifty or 
more legal voters of the district. Two serve 
for one year, two for two years, and three 
serve for three years. 

The actual administration of the school is 
carried on by a superintendent, a supervisor of 
instruction, and six prinicpals, who are selected 
by the board, and who make recommendations 
to the board concerning personnel, curriculum, 
textbooks, budgets, student activities, and pub- 
lic relations activities. 

The principal source of school revenue is the 
general property tax. which is supplemented by 
state aid payments, both in terms of flat grants 
to the district and in terms of some equaliza- 
tion. The tax rate is fixed by referendum un- 
der state statutes, and is based on the assessed 
valuation of the district served by the school. 
This valuation is approximately $45,000,000 
for District No. 428. 

The Board of Education is required by law 
to adopt a budget and appropriation ordinance 
each year. This budget must be made avail- 
able to the public in tentative form for at least 
a week before final action, ancl a public hear- 
ing must be held on it. This hearing is advis- 
ory only and the board is not bound by advice 
given by the public at the hearing. 

The school plant at the present time con- 

I Continued on Page 25' 




Edward McC 



McGIRR 
EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Specialist in 

FARM EQUIPMENT 

and 

INTERNATIONAL MOTOR TRUCKS 



MR. ALEX MAKI 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

ALSO 

SPECIALIZES IN SIDEWALKS 

AND 

DRIVEWAY CONSTRUCTION 

PHONE 6-3576 



Page 22 



c 




1 1 * 




18S6 



CONGRATULATIONS DEKALB! General Electric salutes 
the City of DeKalb on its Centennial. DeKalb has proved 
its progressiveness in the past 100 years not only by past 
achievements, but by its plans for the future. SimilaHy, 
G.E. looks with pride upon its scientific and engineering ac- 
complishments which have brightened lives and lightened 
labor. 



1878 









Seventy-eight years ago, Thomas A. Edison brought light 
to the first successful incandescent lamp. That some year, 
he established the first of the companies which later be- 
came the General Electric Company. 



1946 



In 194i, ninety years after the City of DeKalb was found- 
ed, the DeKalb plant of General Electric, now designated 
the Appliance Motor Department, was opened. Since that 
time G.E. has been a port of the DeKalb Community, shar- 
ing in its responsibilities and rewards. 

As we celebrate our milestones together. General Elec- 
tric salutes the City of DeKalb and looks forward to a 
future of continued community growth and prosperity. May 
our association with DeKalb be one of long duration and 
may it be mutually rewarding. 




'/ i6;yAt7Tn - i 




ELECTRIC 




APPLIANCE MOTOR DEPARTMENT 



PtjOKyie^ Oi. Ou^ Malt Ompo^Uatii P>ijaduct 



Page 23 




THE 

CHARr 

SHOP 




The Charm Shop opened in 1950 on North Third Street. Mrs. Collin bought out the interests 
of the aiari-Nell Dress Shop and completely remodeled the store, adding new lines of women's 
apparel. 

In three short years, The Charm Shop had far outgrown this space and in 1953 moved to their 
present central location which had been vacated by Jukes Fashion Shop. Much expense and 
labor was spent to modernize 

and completely air condition ■^ 

the store to introduce DeKalb 
women to one of the loveliest 
stores in the entire area. Plans 
are now being made for furth- 
er expansion to include a 
downstairs store in the near 
future. 



223 East Lincoln Highway 
In The Center of DeKalb 




Page 24 



sists of seven buildings. The High School build- 
ing was built in 1903. The Junior High was 
built in 1952. and the Carl Littlejohn School, 
a kindergarten through sixth grade building, 
in 1953. The three other buildings in the city 
of DeKalb, are Elhvood having been built in 
1909, and Haish and Glidden in 1903. The 
Cortland School is a four room building built 
in 1935. 

The school staff, in addition to the super- 
intendent and building principals, consists of 
49 elementary teachers, 15 teachers in the Jun- 
ior High School, and 30 teachers in the High 
School. In addition to these there is a special 
art teacher and a special music teacher, two 
speech teachers, one driver training teacher, 
two guidance counsellors (who serve both the 
High School and the Junior High), and a cur- 
riculum director over all grades and high 
school. 

During the school year 1953-54, the total en- 
rollment in the various schools was 2,509. 

The school system provides two ten week 
periods each year of education for adults in 
the community, one in the fall and one in the 
Winter. This activity is self supporting through 
the charge of a $5 registration fee. No school 
credit is given for courses completed. The en- 
rollment for 1953 was 426. 

The Parochial School System of the Rock- 
ford Diocese of the Catholic Church maintains 
St. Mary's School in DeKalb. In this school 
the enrollment for the school year 1953-54 was 
about 300 students, from the first through 
eighth grade. Six teachers were employed. A 
tuition charge is made, based upon the number 
of chilren in the family, and additional support 
comes from contributions from the local par- 
ish. An addition of four rooms was built dur- 
ing the summer of 1954 to care for anticipated 
increases in enrollment. 

Northern Illinois State College operates Mc- 
Murry Laboratory School, an elementary school 
(four year kindergarten through eighth grade). 
The 1954 enrollment was 250. There are 10 
full-time homeroom teachers, plus special tea- 
chers in art, music, physical education, indus- 
trial arts, home economics, as well as a counsel- 
lor, librarian, and nurse. Thus approximately 
14 'r of the children of the district are cared 
for by a state rather than a local appropria- 
tion. 



1906 — FIFTY YEARS — 1956 
OF SERVICE 



JOHN BOARDMAN 



WARREN OSENBERG 



WM. F. WILTBERGER CO. 

— INSURANCE — 

124 N. 3rd St. DeKalb 

PHONE 6-4878 



The Agency That Service Built 



J A P U N T I C H 
DISTRIBUTING CO 

D i s t r i b u tor 
of 

H AMM'S 
BEER 

"The Beer Refreshing" 



1739 E. STATE PHONE DEKALB G-7252 

JOE JAPUNTICH, Owner 



SAUK VALLEY COLLEGE 

LRC 0J2501 



Page 25 




City Hali with first Fire Truck and Horse Drawn 
Police Wagon - 1912 

Fire Department 

The start of DeKalb's fine fire department 
came in 1869 when a hook and ladder company 
was formed. The equipment, homemade by 
Blacksmith Phinas Vaughan, consisted of wood- 
en buckets, three upright ladders, and one roof 
ladder. The "truck" was also made by Vau- 
ghan. 

William H. Miller was captain of the depart- 
ment and he held this post for over 33 years 
until the new paid department was instituted. 

In 1874 a volunteer hose company was or- 
ganized and in 1884 additional equipment and 
men were added. It was on May 12, 1891, 
that Hose Company No. 2 was organized for 
the protection of the northeast part of town. 

A forward step in fire protection was added 
in 1887 when the box alarm system was in- 
stalled at a cost of $195.28. When an alarm 
was turned in, the whistle on the waterworks 
in Huntley Park would sound and the engineer 
would come, determine the location and sound 
the box number by long and short blasts of the 
whistle. This practice was discontinued in 
1916 because of the crowds which gathered at 
the fires. 



WE ARE GROWING WITH DEKALB 

Visit Us In Our New Location 

MEL ELLIOTT MUSIC CENTER 

132 East Lincoln Highway 

Pianos . . Organs . . Hi-Fi Instruments 
Instructions 



Compliments of 

H. M. STEWART AGENCY 

JULIUS SILVERMAN 
INSURANCE — REAL ESTATE 

130 North Second Street 
PHONE 6-2421 



Kishwaukee Airport, Inc. 

— LEARN TO FLY — 

Aufhorized Cessna Dealers 

Instruction . . Charter . . Sales and Service 

G.I. Bill of Rights . . Airplane Rental 

DEKALB MUNICIPAL AIRPORT 

Phone DeKalb 6-3212 Pleasant St., DeKalb, 111. 



Congratulations 



Burcti kmWi 



lhe diamond house 

BURCH JEWELERS 

The Diamond House 



Page 26 




DeKalb Fire Station and equipment 1904 to 1912 



On August 5. 1903, the city Council author- 
ized a paid department and made arrange- 
ments for a station house. This department 
came into being February 4, 1904, with Hans 
Erickson, James Klock, Mike McEvoy and 
Charles Barr as DeKalb Fire Department No. 
1. For equipment they had a combination 
chemical and hose wagon pulled by two horses. 
Later this was augmented by a ladder wagon 
made in DeKalb by Andrew Nelson. 

Progress came into the picture on August 
1, 1912, when a truck was put into service. 
The chemical wagon was sold to the town Iron 
River, Michigan. 

This truck met an untimely end when it was 
struck by a passenger train at Fir.st Street on 
June 17, 1913. There were no casualties, but 
DeKalb's fire department was halved. How- 
ever, the DeKalb Wagon Company lent the city 



one of the trucks it was making, and it was 
used until December of that year. 

In the succession of trucks used by the De- 
Kalb department was one purchased from the 
DeKalb Wagon Company in 1916. It was a 
chain drive with a Continental Motor and rep- 
resented the last word in fire equipment. 

In 1926 the platoon system was instituted, 
giving the firemen better working conditions 
and providing the city with a reserve in case 
of danger. 

One of the interesting stories about the de- 
partment was the call to Malta in 1897. Upon 
their arrival, the men found that the hose 
would not fit the Malta hydrants, and the de- 
partment was helpless. It is said that the de- 
partment was transported to Malta on a flat 
car. 



Page 27 



A BUSINESS WITH A GREAT FUTURE 

OPERATING IN A CITY WITH A GREAT PAST 

AND A GREATER FUTURE 

JAMES F. SIMON CO. 

123 SOUTH FIRST ST. 
DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



SUPPLIERS TO SCHOOLS AND INDUSTRY 
OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



Brunswick School Furniture 

Art Metal Steel Office Furniture 

Weber-Costello Chalkboard and Art Supplies 

Lyon Steel Equipment 



SECOR'S 

PHARMACY and STATIONERS 

For Complete Service 



COLLEGE TEXTBOOKS AT ALL TIMES 
COSMETICS — TOILETRIES 

SICKROOM SUPPUES 

PERSONAL GREETING CARDS 

STATIONERY 



207 EAST LINCOLN HIGHWAY 



Police Department 

Early accounts are silent on the actions of 
police in DeKalb until 1885 when the City 
Council established the Police Department on 
July twenty-second. 

At that time a Mai'shall and Assistant Mar- 
shall were authorized and duties were pre- 
scribed. A "calaboose" was mentioned in the 
ordinance, but no specific location was provid- 
ed. It is believed that it was located where the 
fire station is today. 

From then on the records are quite sketchy. 
It is known that T. J. Adams was chief in 1899 
and 1909 and the names of Oliver Jones and 
Alec Blount are remembered by old timers. 
Pictures of the Crimson Day parades show the 
police wearing the helmets of the period. 

Later names of Frank Ridell, James Scott, 
and the vei-y popular Sid Rowe are recalled. 

In 1916 an ambulance was purchased which 
doubled as a patrol wagon replacing the horse 
drawn vehicle then in use. It was around 1919 
that motorcycles were introduced into the pic- 
ture. 

Since the building of the City Hall in 1891. 
the headquarters of the department have been 
located there. 



Railroads of DeKalb 

Chicago and Northwestern Railroad 

The first railroad to enter the City of DeKalb 
was the Galena and Chicago Union Railroad, 
which reached its terminus on August 12, 1853. 
Its station was erected at Third Street, just 
back of where the J. C. Penny Store stands to- 
day. This .station was on the north side of the 
tracks. The second station to be built was on 
the other side of the same street. Later it was 
moved to the site between Sixth and Seventh 
Sreets on the north side of the tracks where the 
east end was used for a passenger station and 
the west end for freight. 

This station continued to be used until 1891 
when the double track of the railroad was com- 
pleted and the .station which we now know to- 
day was built. This station has been in con- 
stant use ever since, having been remodeled 
about ten years ago. 

The old station across the tracks from the 
present brick one is used for less than carload 
freight and the east end is rented to a whole- 
sale grocery firm. Across the tracks to the 
ea.st was what was known as the out-bound 
freight .station where all of the out-bound le.ss 
than carload freight was handled. It is now 
used by the DeKalb Molasses Feed Company. 

It is interesting to note that on August 25, 

(Continued on Page 30) 



Page 28 




The above symbolized the collective thinking of the small band of DeKalb 
County farmers who founded our company. Down through the years it has 
been our guiding light and goal. 

The success with which this has been achieved can be measured in the 
fact that today — as in the past 16 years — more farmers plant DeKalb 
than any other seed corn. 

DeKalb Chix, likewise, are now known the country over and are assuming 
a place of leadership in the poultry industry. 

A DeKalb first — hybrid sorghum — has made its appearance only this 
year on the great plains — it is destined to become another great companion 
to the flying ear and flying chix. 




DEKALB AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Commercial Producers and DistTibutors of DeKalb Corn, Chix and Hybrid Sorghum 



Page 29 



1853, the Galena and Chicago Union Railroad 
placed into service a locomotive which was 
named The DeKalb. This was a 75 ton engine 
built by Baldwin Locomotive Works and had 
a copper fire box. It probably was the second 
coal burning engine to be used by the Galena 
and Chicago Union Railroad. 

Because of the great use of passenger trains 
in the early days, the Chicago and Northwest- 
ern Railway, which was a successor to the Gal- 
ena and Chica,go Union, ran many trains from 
DeKalb to Chicago. Among the best known 
trains of that day was the Clinton passenger 
which ran from Chicago to Clinton and also 
the Sterling passenger which ran from Chicago 
to Sterling and return. The Sterling was a 
much used train, arriving in DeKalb around 
8:15 in the morning, eastbound, and coming 
back about 6:30 in the evening. It was a very 
popular train with the merchants of the town 
who went to Chicago to do their buying. 

In 1884 there was built north and south from 
DeKalb, the Northern Illinois Railroad con- 
necting Belvidere with the coal fields of Spring 
Valley. This railroad was taken over by the 
Chicago and Northwestern Railway on June 9, 
1888. 

When this railroad was in operation with its 
passenger service, it was possible to go by train 
from DeKalb to Madison, Wisconsin and, by 
changing cars at Belvidere, to Rockford and 
Freeport. The trains from the south, particu- 
larly the one arriving around eight o'clock in 
the morning, carried many students to the De- 
Kalb schools in the heyday of the railroad. The 
passenger service was discontinued early in the 
1920's. The line to the north was discontinued 
north of Sycamore in 1942, but the line south 
to Spring Valley is still a very important link 
in the Chicago and Northwestern System. 

Chicago Great Western 

The line running from DeKalb to Sycamore 
was built in 1893 as the DeKalb and Great 
Western Railway, which was a subsidiary of 
the Chicago Great Western. 

This line, for a long time, gave DeKalb pas- 
senger service from DeKalb to Chicago via 
Sycamore and at various times offered excur- 
sion rates to St. Charles where P.ottowatomi 
Park was the attraction. The Chicago and 
Great Western abandoned its track from De- 
Kalb to Sycamore in the early 1950's and now 
uses the tracks of the Chicago Northwestern 
Railway once a day for a switch run to come 
to DeKalb to serve the industries on its line. 

Illinois, Iowa and Minnesota Railway 

This railway, built as an outer belt line to 
eliminate the traffic through Chicago, reached 



JOHNSON 
CONCRETE COMPANY 

1302 East Lincoln Highway 
P. O. Box 44 

READY MIX 



PHONE 6-2922 



DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



Congratulations — 

TO THE CITY OF DE KALB 



«^^e) 



FOX VALLEY 

CLEANERS and LAUNDERERS 
OF DISTINCTION 



Page 30 




Sycamore Road in front of Sanitarium in 1908. Note DeKalb - Sycamore Electric Car at right 






DeKalb October 24, 1904. when a 38 car 
freight train pulled into the station here. The 
next day a special train ran from Aurora to 
DeKalb carrying passengers. 

This railroad was taken over in 1909 by the 
Chicago, Milwaukee and Gary Railway and 
was extended from DeKalb to Rockford 
through Kirkkland. In 1922, the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railway took it 
over, abandoning the line north of Kirkland. 
In 1947. that part of the railroad between De- 
Kalb and Aurora was abandoned and torn up, 
but the balance of the line from DeKalb to Kirk- 
land is still an important part of the Milwaukee 
System. 

Chicago, Aurora and DeKalb Railway 

This railway was built in 1904 and 1905 
from Aurora to DeKalb. They used steam pow- 
er for a while, later fitted up a street car from 
the Aurora City System with a gasoline engine 
which they used until 1908. This was not sat- 
isfactory and in 1909 three electric passenger 
cars and two express cars w^ere purchased. 
The first trip of these cars was in 1910. The 
terminal was at Fourth Street in the Building 
now occupied by the Public Service Company 
for a meter testing building. The line failed in 
1916 and was abandoned and scrapped in 1922. 

DeKalb Sycamore 
Electric Traction Company 

There was an electric traction company 
operating between DeKalb and Sycamore in 



the early days of the twentieth century. This 
line was built and ready for operation on Dec- 
ember 13th, 1903. The road ran from the west 
door of the Administration Building of the col- 
lege, down Normal Road to Lincoln Highway, 
east to Fourth, north to Oak, east to Tenth, 
north to Pleasant and east to Thirteenth which 
followed to Sycamore Road, which road it fol- 
lowed into Sycamore. 

Half hour service was maintained through- 
out mo.st of the time this road was in existence. 
The cars left DeKalb every hour on the hour 
and left Sycamore every half hour. The equip- 
ment of the road consisted of three passenger 
cars, the combination work and sweeper car 
plus a number of open summer cars. 

This company purchased and maintained a 
park about half way between DeKalb and 
Sycamore which was called Electric Park. In 
this park was a ball diamond, a pavilion for 
dancing, a theatre and a picnic ground. Many 
a celebration on Labor Day and 4th of July was 
held here. 

At one time the company advertised that you 
could leave DeKalb on the eight o'clock car in 
the evening and arrive at Electric Park to at- 
tend a vaudeville and motion picture show at 
the theatre at 8:15 and the total cost including 
a reserved seat in the theatre was twenty-five 
cents. 

(Continued on Page 34) 



Page 31 



THE DEKALB DAILY CHRONICLE 



PRICE n\T CENTS 



START CENTENNIAL PAGEANT CASTING 



«BVHr:eilmrrnnii rnn 



WILL DEPICT 
DEKALB STORY 




Page 32 




Penny Flame'says: 



If s a privilege .. " 



To UBKAlb on her 100th anniversary, Penny Flame and all of us 
at Northern Illinois Gas say: "Happy Birthday!" While the community 
celebrates, we think it's a good time to tell you we're proud to carry 
on a long-standing tradition of service to the people of DeKalb . . . 
it's a privilege we look forward to carrying on for years to come. 

As you may know, one of our predecessor companies brought the early 
conveniences of gas to DeKalb shortly after the turn of the century. It 
was in 1901 when the newly-constructed, coal-gas plant of the DeKalb 
County Gas Company began serving the city. Since then, modern gas has 
come a long way. The homemaker of today enjoys fast, clean, economical 
cooking — speedy, low-cost water heating — silent, trouble-free refriger- 
ation and many other comforts and conveniences that gas provides for the 
finest features of better living. Today, more than half a million homes, 
businesses and industries we serve throughout northern Illinois use gas in 
a myraid of ways hardly dreamed-of a century ago. 



Gas serves You 
and the Community, too! 



*Trade-Mark. 

Copyright. 1956, Northern Illinois Cas Company 



NORTHERN 
I Lkl NOIS 



6as 



COMPANY 



Page 33 




West Lincoln Highway - 1904 



This road did a thriving business in the days 
before the hard road and the automobile and 
was used by many of the workers who worked 
in DeKalb or Sycamore and lived in the other 
town. However, in 1924, it bowed to the in- 
evitable and on April 17th, 1924, the road went 
out of service when the eleven o'clock car out 
of Sycamore entered the Car Barn in DeKalb. 
It was soon scrapped and the road is nothing 
more than a memory at the present time. 

These are only a part of the many railroads 
which were projected through DeKalb in the 
early days. Other railroads were projected 
from the south heading toward Rockford, but 
not built. It was possible at one time for a per- 
son to go from DeKalb to New York by inter- 
urban car, leaving DeKalb on the Chicago, 
Aurora and DeKalb and making connections in 
Chicago. 

Buses 

Following the electric line out of DeKalb, 
bus routes were established from DeKalb to 



Sycamore and from DeKalb to Geneva and 
from DeKalb to Dixon. These bus lines oper- 
ated spasmodically for several years and the 
ones east and west in particular were finally 
merged into what we know now as the Grey- 
hound Lines, which run through DeKalb. Bus 
service between DeKalb and Sycamore has 
been spasmodic as the traffic has not been too 
great, although in latter years the buses seem 
to have a firmer foothold. 

Intra City Transportation 

The first intra city transportation probably 
was the "hotel bus" which the hotels maintain- 
ed to meet the train and carry prospective 
guests to the respective places. Another means 
of transportation inside the city was the horse 
drawn hack which was available at the livery 
stables for wedding, funerals, and other occas- 
ions. 

As the automobile came into existence, in 
1915, a jitney bus was established, which ran 



Page 34 



on a specified route at a fare of five cents. 
Soon, however, this was changed to a 10 cent 
fare and was not run on a specified route, but 
could be taken to any part of the city. It is 
from this bus that our present system of taxi 
cabs has developed. 

Intra city bus lines have been tried on three 
occasions and at no time have they been a suc- 
cess. For some reason or other, the people of 
DeKalb prefer to ride taxis instead of a bus. 

Waterworks 

A system of waterworks was installed early 
in the history of DeKalb. In the early 1870's 
about 1872 or 1875 a well was dug in Huntley 
Park and a system of mains laid. This water- 
works system is said to be the thirteenth sys- 
tem to be installed in the state of Illinois. 

A windmill was used for pumping and a 
round tank on stilts was built for a reservoir. 
This equipment served until a steam pump was 
installed and the windmill sold in September 
of 1886. 

Due to the demand for water for a growing 
population a standpipe was authorized to be 
erected in Huntley Park on February 12, 1889. 
This measure and all of the following ordin- 
ances of the city council pertaining to the 
standpipe passed by a majority of one vote. 

The standpipe was finished on September 
20, 1889 and the opposition claimed it could not 
be filled. The city engineer turned on the 
pumps and after six days had the 242,000 gal- 
lon tank overflowing. 

It served its time and was replaced by a new 
elevated tank on July 2. 1952. The Huntley 
Park tank wa,s drained October 30, 1952 61 
years after its completion. 

In 1951 and 1952 extensions to the system 
were made co.sting $550,000 which was covered 
by revenue bonds. 

This is a far cry from the .story in 1889 when 
900 customers iDaid $6,500 for water and the 
city had onlv 14 miles of mains. 



Congratulations 

LEONARDS JEWELERS 

318 East Lincoln Highway 
Honest Values 



An important part of our services is to provide your organization 
with the most up-to-date time-saving office machines, accessories, 
equipment and supplies so that your office may function more 
efficiently. 



mCl^HAN 



20 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS 7th IN DEKALB 



Goodyear Tires Exide Batteries 

MILT ANDERSON'S 
Gulf Service 

North First and Locust South Fourth and Taylor 

DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



CHILTON'S SPORT SHOP 



148 N. Second St. 



Phone 6-3152 



DeKalb, 111. 



TEAM OirmTTERS and HOBBIES 



Wilson, Rowlings and Spalding Sports Equipment 



FOLEY'S 

Pies — Cakes — Donuts 



ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 



Page 35 



Communications 



It was 1879 that the first mention of a tele- 
phone was made in the DeKalb Chronicle. On 
September 20, 1879 it was stated that Ithamer 
Robinson was in Chicago to see about a tele- 
phone line from DeKalb to Sycamore. 

In 1888 a news item reported that one of the 
downtown stores had a connection made with 
a place in the northeast part of town. In 1890 
the Rollin? Mills on Second and Locust was 
linked with the Glidden House (Hotel DeKalb) 
by phone. Telephone installations were news 
in those days. 

In this era the Central Union Telephone 
Company was operating and on June 11, 1895 
the DeKalb County Telephone Company was 
organized. Three years later in 1898 they 
were given a franchise by the City Council. 

From then until 1912 two telephone com- 
panies were in operation in DeKalb. It was 
common for the business houses to advertise 
"both phones." 

On April 1, 1912 the DeKalb County Tele- 
phone Company purchased the interests of the 
Central Union. Later the name was changed 
to DeKalb Ogle Telephone Company. This 
company has expanded until now they are 
housed in their own building and the system 
has been changed to dial operation, the latter 
change taking place June 13, 1954. 

It is not certain when the telegraph came to 
town e.xcept to surmise that it came with the 
railroad. The Western Union has always 
maintained an office here. One of the inter- 
esting papers in the historical files is a letter 
from Malta to the Western Union in DeKalb 
to send a telegram to Piano. The date 1872. 

The Pcstal Telegraph came with the Chicago 
Great Western but has not maintained an of- 
fice here for some time. 

When the radio bug hit this country three 
DeKalb youths were among the first to build 
sets. These three were Charles Parson, Claude 
Middleton and Willard McEwen. 

DeKalb's radio station came into being in 
1946 when Rev. T. H. Lane and others formed 
the DeKalb Radio Studios with studios in the 
Wright Building, but no transmitter. They op- 
erated through WMRO in Aurora for about 
six months. 

Later they erected their own transmitter on 
North First Street and went on the air for the 
first time December 8, 1947. On November 5, 
1955 they moved into their own studios on 
North First Street. The transmitter was also 
moved to the same site. 



Congratulations 

MARTHA'S 

Dresses — Skirls — Costume Jewelry 
Lingerie 

314 East Lincoln Highv/ay 



LIBERTY TRUCKING COMPANY 

1401 WEST FULTON STREET 
CHICAGO 7, ILLINOIS 

CHICAGO: HAYMARKET 1-2100 
ELGIN: SHERWOOD 1-2224 

DEKALB: 6-6533 



Building with DeKalb 
Your House of Friendly Service . . . the 

TOWER FINANCE 
Corporation 

Loans $25 to $500 



130 N. Fourth St. 



Phone: 6-3418 



L & P STANDARD SERVICE 

LEFT HANDED STATION 
DEKALB, ILLINOIS 

Bill Lang Brooks Parker 

1st and East Lincoln Hwy. Telephone 6-4732 



Page 36 



ORGANIZATION OF THE DE KALB CENTENNIAL 
Officers 

JAMES E. ROLFING President 

FRANCIS R. GEIGLE Vice President 

FRANCIS E. CASH | Co-Treasurer 

ARTHUR J. KRUPP J 

JAMES M. MORRIS General Chairnnan 

DeWITT OSGOOD Secretary 

Executwe Covimittee 

John Boardman A. W. Jackson 

Helene Collin Adrian Jacobson 

Jessie Glidden E. E. Miller 

Philmore Iskowich C. Edward Raymond 



HEADQUARTERS DIVISION 

Brooks Parker — Chairman 
Mrs. Ralph Nelson 
Lawrence Shipman 

TRAFFIC DIVISION 

John Ramsey — Chairman 
Victor Sorich 
Robert Haldeman 



FIREWORKS DIVISION 

Paul E. Johnson — Chairman 
C. A. Mellinger — Co-Chairman 
Robert Canon 
R. C. Anderson 
Thomas Crooke 
Clifford Binder 
V. Sarich 
C. Kennedy 



UNDERWRITING DIVISION 

Howard Nelson 
Henry Meier 
Co-Chairmen 

DECORATIONS DIVISION 

Neale R. Skorberg — Chairman 



HEADQUARTERS PERSONNEL 

Mrs. Helen Olsen 
Mrs. Jean Sparks 
Mrs. James Sawyer 
Bob Davis 
Mrs. Helen Swanbum 



REVENUE DIVISION 
George Black, Chairman 



HISTORICAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Aaron Hanson — Chairman 
George P. Clark 
Edith Marken 
William R. Bushong 
Waite Embree 

CELEBRATION BALL COMMITTEE 

Mr, and Mrs. John A. Leifheit, Chairmen 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Thorsen 

Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Tyler 

Mr. and Mrs. Nye LaBow 

Dr. and Mrs. James Feeney 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay T, Modloff 

Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Terwilliger 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Cook 



CONCESSIONS COMMITTEE 

L. M. Corson — Chairman 
Jack Simmons 
Steve Yusko 
Earl Sullivan 
Thomas Eby 
Shirley Wielert 
Kelsey Oldham 
Oilman Schimmoler 
Ed. Hutchison 



NOVELTIES COMMITTEE 

Joseph L. Katz — Chairman 
James Breen 



PROMOTIONAL DIVISION 

Mrs. Dale Jenkins, Chairmayi, Ladies Division 
Mr. Robert Brown, Chairman, Men's Division 



BROTHERS OF THE BRUSH COMMITTEE 

Edward McGirr — Chairman 

Mullie Mullvain 

Ed. Rohlik 

Richard Jensen * 

Elmer Leeds 

Ted White 

Mike Sarich 

MEN'S HATS COMMITTEE 

Philip Simon — Chairman 
Ralph Seats 

SISTERS OF THE SWISH COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Raymond Kahle — Chairman 

Mrs. Orville Shipman 

Mrs. Dennis Collins 

Barbara Minard 

Mrs. Raymond Katz 

Edith Wentworth 

Mrs. John Boardmon 

LADIES SUN BONNETS COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Robert Hunt — Chairman 
Mrs. Ivan Rinehart 
Mrs. John Remsey 
Mrs. Ernest Hanson 
Mrs. Leonard Cummins 
Mrs. Edward Wagley 
Mrs. John Huntzicker 
Mrs. Robert Ball 



Co-Chairmen 



SISTERS OF THE SWISH 
Charter Committee 

Mrs. Frank Blitzblou'l 
Mrs. Harry Brody J 
Mrs. Martin Bartels 
Mrs. Harold Wright 
Mrs. Joe Katz 



CENTENNIAL COSTUME CONTEST 

Mrs. E. Huntzicker — Chairman 
Mrs. Dennis Collins 
Mrs. Wayne Cook 
Mrs. Henry Embree 
Mrs. John Boardman 
Helena Collin 
Mrs. Harold Nolin 
Mrs. Orville Shipman 



PRIZES FOR COSTUMES 

Winifred Stewart — Chairman 
Alma Budd 

COSTUME JUDGES COMMITTEE 

Mrs. George Dertinger — Chairman 

Mrs. Clark Countryman 

Miss Mary Jane Seed 

Mrs. Henry Meyer, Rochelle 

Mrs. Paul VanNatta, Sycamore 

Mrs. Earl Pritchard, Maple Park 

FAMILY TINTYPE COMPETITION 

Mrs. Forrest Andrews — Chairman 

Mrs. H. L. Cummins 

Mrs. Mandel Herr 

Mrs. S. A. Tyler 

Mrs. Leslie Winters 

Mrs. Michael Horan 

Mrs. Vernon Seitzinger 

PROMENADE AND CARAVAN COMMITTEE 

Warren Osenberg — Chairman 

Lyie Schule 

James Modglin 

Thomas Bollas 

Al. Johnson 

Edwin Schoemperlen 

KANGAROO COURT COMMITTEE 

Curtis Bogle — Chairman 

Edward McGirr — Judge 

Wayne Bogle — Judge 

Slim Kittleson — Chief 

Bill Lang — Chief 

KOPS— 

Clark Cryor 

Don Robertson 

Jack Simmons 

Toddy Allen 

Jim Scott 

Smiley Concidine 

Tom Cliffe 

Itch Skoglund 

Scotty Buchon 

Joe Stossel 

Hippit Lawson 

Earl Sullivan, Jr. 



SPECTACLE TICKET DIVISION 
Charles Raymond, Chairynan 



TICKET COMMITTEE 

Lawrence Greenacre, — Chairman 
Jim Besenfelder 
Charles Reeser 
C. E. Moore 



PATRONS TICKET COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Homer Cobb — Chairman 

CASHIERS AND GATES COMMITTEE 

E. 0. Hoppe — Chairman 



QUEEN CONTEST COMMITTEE 

J. Milton Anderson — Chairman 

Mrs. Carl Wallin 

Howard Nelson 

Elmer Sanderson 

Carl Swanson 

Mrs. Phyllis Stowe 

William Terwilliger 



Mrs. Clifford Gilmore 
Mrs. Betty Pyfer 
Miss Catherine Pesut 
Mrs. Del Borine 
Jim Besenf elder 
Wood row Royalty 
Ava Biogini 



SPECTACLE DIVISION 
Richard Hietikko. Chairman 



SCENARIO AND TITLE COMMITTEE 

S. B. Sullivan — Chairman 

Charles Gunn 

Carl Wiltberger 

Vere Goodyear 

Mrs. Harriet Davy 

Otto Gabel 

Carl Littlejohn 

Mrs. Bertha Rutledge 

Dr. J. A. Spickerman 

Michael Malone 

Jerome Berkes 

COSTUME AND MAKE-UP COMMITTEE 

Carroll Hauser — Chairman 
Mrs. Chester Oleson 
Mrs. Charles Findley 
Mrs. Wilbur Yauch 
Mrs. Eleanor Janeway 
Mrs. Mary Smith 
Mrs. Jerry Jensen 
Mrs. Richard Meier 
Mrs. W. H. Sexton 
Mrs. Fred Woods 
Mrs. Lincoln M. Young 
Mrs. Clarence Waldier 



CAST COMMITTEE 

Helaine Hynes- 
Gerald Conde 



-Chairman 



PROPERTIES COMMITTEE 

Mr. and Mrs. James Sawyer, Jr. — Chairmen 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carr 

Mr. and Mrs. John Bower 

Mr. and Mrs. Hal Galbreath 

Mr. and Mrs. James Sawyer, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joy Diehl 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Eychaner 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Soar 

Mr. and Mrs. Judd Storey 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hyre 

Mr. and Mrs. Bud Smith 



CONSTRUCTION COMMITTEE 

Kenneth Hallgren — Chairman 

Halverson Bros. 

Robert Rich 

Ernie Hansen 

Tony Antonsen 

Joe Stossel 



PRESS RELEASE COMMITTEE 

Wm. Froom 
Don Ulery 



PUBLICITY DIVISION 
K. M. Snyder, Chairman 



Co-Chairmen 



DISTRIBUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Leo B. Olson — Chairman 
Don Duncan 
Ray Robinson 
Michael Pence 

CENTENNIAL SEAL COMMITTEE 

Franklin Morley — Chairman 
Mrs. Helen Merritt ^ 

Mrs. Gertrude Parcelis 
Miss Mary Swynehardt 

CENTENNIAL HISTORIAN COMMITTEE 

Waite W. Embree — Chairman 



SPEAKERS COMMITTEE 

Percy Read — Chairman 
Harold Eatherington 
Ben W. Mattek 
Kenneth W. Kassel 
J. Clayton Pooler 



RADIO AND TV COMMITTEE 

Lois Still — Chairman 
Mrs. Russell Lindstrom 
Mrs. George Olsen 



WOMEN'S PRESS COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Marcella Aspengren — Chairman 
Mrs. M. W. Edgar 
Mrs. Burt Oderkirk 
Miss Frances Sarich 
Miss Jane Freed 



HOSPITALITY DIVISION 
Jolly Erickson, Chairvian 



DIGNITARIES AND GUESTS COMMITTEE 

Robert Greenaway — Chairman 

HOUSING COMMITTEE 

Art O. Erickson — Chairman 
Paul Fairbrook 
Francis Farley 
Roy Rice 



OFFICIAL ENTERTAINING COMMITTEE 

T. E. Courtney, Jr. — Chairman 

PIONEER RECOGNITION COMMITTEE 

Henry H. Embree — Chairman 
Renwick W. Spear 
Robert Ball 
Arthur Buehring 
William Randall 



SPECIAL EVENTS DIVISION 
Dee Palmer, Chairman 



MERCHANTS PROMOTION COMMITTEE 

Charles W. Fister — Chairman 

Ben W. Gordon 

John C. Condon 

Keeth A. Kost 

Robert O. Schoenherr 

Joe M. Packer 

L. M. Corson 

J. W, Modeen 

PARADES COMMITTEE 

C. W, Freitag — Chairman 

Ivan Williams — Parade Marshal 
Ed Carlson 
Wilbur A. Smith 
John Eokle 

D. M. Schafer 
James R. Parker 
Will Widerberg 
James S. Lamb 
Reuben Riipi 

Henry J. Hermanowicz 
Harold Bluhm 
Quentin Tucker 



Richard Worthington 
Robert Berkinbine 
Leo Remsey 
Ed. A. Harold 
Donald Larson 
Robert Cannon 

HISTORICAL WINDOWS COMMITTEE 

Ed Knodle — Chairman 
Ken Holler 
Robert Montgomery 
Beatrice Gurler 
Robert Bowers 
Mrs. Swen Mobeck 
Robert Bullington 
Willard Widerberg 
Frank Moore 

MUSIC COMMITTEE 

Russell Lindstrom — Chairman 
Gerald M. Poouwe 
Myron W. Madison 
Bill Wennlund 
Robert Montgomery 



SPECIAL DAYS COiMMITTEE 
Donald M. Amos, Chairman 



RELIGIOUS DEDICATION 

Chas. J. Chamberlain- 
Rev. Stiles Lessly 
Rev, Milton Gustafson 
Rev. Daniel Huntwork 
Tom Buffington 
Dr. Vernon Fay 
Dee Palmer 

YOUNG AMERICA'S DAY 

Robert Smith — Chairman 
John Boardman 
Wm. Davis 
Dick Meiers 
Virgil Nehring 
Warren Osenberg 
Ray Stonecipher 
Don Riley 



-Chairman 



Jim Weigand 
Jim Lamb 
Willard Weiderberg 
John Chilton 
Nye LoBaw 
Rosemary Baxa 
Carol Taylor 

FAITH IN OUR FUTURE DAY 

Albert W. Leonhard — Chairman 

EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY 

Lowell Ray — Chairman 

Harold Bluhm 

B. F. Brickley 

Reid Keene 

Tracy Arnold 

Don Duncan 



PIONEER AND HOMECOMING DAY 

DeEstin Pasley — Chairman 
Paul A. Nehring, Sr. 
Thure Hallgren 
Dr. George E. Boardman 
Forrest W. Andrews 
Kenneth Snyder 
Mrs. Scott Peacock 
Mrs. Harry McEwen 



RURAL DAYS 

Harold Nolin — Chairman 

Al Golden 

Morris Reed 

Paul Duncan 

Paul Montavon 

Tom Roberts, Jr. 

Paul Furr 

Carl Littlejohn 



LADIES DAY 

Carol Troescher, General Chairv-ian 

Chainnayi of Fashion Show. Mrs. James E. Rolfing 



SCENERY 

Miss Gladys Larson — Chairman 

Miss Eva Benson 

Miss Margaret Devine 

Miss Elsa Larson 

Miss Gen Jacobson 

Miss Louise Johnson 

RESERVATIONS 

Mrs Robert Abbott — Chairman 

Mrs. Richard Myrland 

Mrs. Philmore Iskowich 

Mrs. Robert Skoglund 

Mrs. Thos Courtney, Jr. 

Mrs. Reid Keene 

Mrs. Joseph Ebbesen 

PROGRAMS 

Mrs. Loring Jones — Chairman 

Mrs. Raymond Kotz 

Mrs. Harold Nolin 

Mrs. Stanley Knetsch 

Mrs. James Merritt 

Mrs. Carl Swanson, Jr. 

ADVERTISING 

Mrs. Edward Raymond — Chairman 

Mrs. 0. I. Stevens 

Mrs. Ben Mottek 

Mrs. Francis Cash 

Mrs. David Bush 

Mrs. L. J. Childs 

Mrs. S. A. Tyler 

Mrs. Evelyn Anderson 

COSTUMES 

Mrs. Orville Baker — Chairman 

Mrs. Earl Smith 

Mrs. Wendell Lindbeck 

Mrs. Paul Hartman 

Mrs. John Thompson 

Mrs. Robert Broadus 

Mrs. S. M. Meyer 

FLOWERS 

Mrs. Richard Jensen — Chairman 
Mrs. Virgil Cook 
Mrs. Robert Olsen 



HOSTESSING 

Mrs. Howard Nelson — Chairman 

Mrs. Ralph McAllister 

Mrs. Ken Snyder 

Mrs. Russell Rasmussen 

Mrs. Loren Caldwell 

Mrs. Walter Renner 

Mrs. Geo. Terwilliger 

Mrs. John Boyle, Jr. 

Mrs. Geo. Dertinger 

Mrs. Adrian Jacobson 

Mrs. Robert Roose 

Mrs. James Parker 

Mrs. Lyie Raber 

Mrs. Richard Wiltberger 

Mrs. Paul Hunt 

Mrs. Vernon Johnson 

Mrs. Renwick Speer 

Mr. A. D. Oderkirk 

Mrs. Paul Smith 

Mrs. Ray G. Peterson 

Mrs. Richard Hietikko 

Mrs. Carl Moeller 

AArs. Stanley Halloran 

Rosonn Nelson 

Jackie Snyder 

Pat Boyle 

SET-UP 

Mrs. Harold Wright — Chairman 
Mrs. Donald Frantz 
Mrs. James Ellis 
Mrs. Ernest Oleson 

GUESTS 

Miss Bernadine Hanby — Chairman 

Mrs. Ben Davy 

Miss Jessie Glidden 

Mrs. Woite Embree 

Mrs. Edgar Knodle 

FOOD AND EQUIPMENT 

Mrs. L. Montgomery — Chairman 

Miss Nancy Schulenberg 

Mrs. Charlotte Allen 

Mrs. Raymond Peterson 

Mrs. J. C. Lundberg 

Mr. Ross Moriarity 



CLEAN UP 

Mrs. Brooks Brickley — Choirman 

Mrs. Allan Anderson 

Mrs. Harold Federspiel 

Mrs. Eugene Stefoni 

Mrs. Beuren Ellis 

Mrs. Lawrence Smith 

Mrs. Robert Burke 

Mrs. Frank Blitzblau 

Mrs. Wm. Robbins 

Mrs. Grant Suttie 

Mrs. Paul Crawford 

Mrs. W. H. Sexton 

TRIO MUSIC 

Mrs. Harold Monn 

Mrs. Thomas Roberts 

Mrs. Harold Bluhm 

ART SHOW 

Mrs. Ivan Rinehort — Chairman 

Mrs. J. A. Spickerman 

Mrs. Carl W. Moeller 



SERVING AND REPLENISHING 

Mrs. W. Yauch — Chairman 

Mrs. Karl Kunzie 

Mrs. Joseph Clettenberg 

Mrs. Ernest Hanson 

Mrs. Roderick Kohler 

Mrs. John Benben 

Mrs. R. Bolke 

Mrs. Hazel Hull 

Mrs. Roy Briggs 

Mrs. Arthur Krupp 

Mrs. Wm. Stevens 

Martin Bartels 

E. H. Maurer 



FLOWER COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Russell Rasmussen 
Mrs. Robert Hainds 
Mrs. Hugh Jameson 



BROTHERS OF THE BRUSH 



1. 


A & P Grocers 


2. 


Andy's Bushmen 


3. 


American Legion 


4. 


Bob & Scotty 


5. 


Bross & Kittlesons Boys 


6. 


California Pack Kernels 


7. 


DeKalb Commercial Body 


8. 


E. & L. Tap 


9. 


Eagles 


10. 


G. E. Homesteaders 


11. 


Locust St. Brusher 


12. 


Jensens Rose Brusher 


13. 


Diners Dizzy Dopes 


14. 


Chink Johnsons Chinks 


15. 


K. of C. 


16. 


Lang & Parker Stooges 


17. 


Les & Sals 


18. 


Milt Andersons Men 


19. 


Manly Methodists 


20. 


McGirr Generals 


21. 


The Mule Skinners 


22. 


Live Wires 


23. 


The Yard Birds 


24. 


Pearsons Pioneers 


25. 


Fritzes Fuzz Men 


26. 


Rohliks Rustlers 


27. 


Rukavinas Tavern 


28. 


Sullivans Prospectors 


29. 


Tilton Park Neighbors 


30. 


Twins 


31. 


Ten-0-Nine Club 


32. 


Wurii Tuners 


33. 


Cousin Bill and His Bearded Cousins 


34. 


Sod Busters 


35. 


Square and Compass 


36. 


DeKalb Hybrids 


37. 


Mullies South Siders 



A & P Food Store 

Andys Tavern 

American Legion 

Bob & Scotty's Tavern 

Bross & Kittleson Service Station 

California Packing Corporation 

DeKalb Commercial Body 

E. & L. Tap 

Eagles Club 

General Electric Co. 

Goal Post 

Jensens Greenhouse 

Johnny's Diner 

Kingston 

Knights of Columbus 

Lang & Parker Service Station 

Les & Sals Tavern 

Milt Andersons Service Station 

Methodist Mens Club 

McGirr Equipment Co. 

McCobes Tavern 

Nehring Electrical Works 

State College Ground Crew 

Pearsons Tavern 

Rainbow Room 

Eds Tavern 

Rukavinas Tavern 

Sullivans Tavern 

Twin Tavern 
Ten-0-Nine Tavern 
Wurlitzer Co. 
Voorhies Barber Shop 
DeKalb Farm Supply 
Masonic Lodge 

DeKalb Agricultural Association 
Mullies Shell Station 



RICHARD 
Business 



THE CITIZENS OF DE KALB 

PROUDLY PRESENT 

THE DRAMATIC HISTORICAL PANORAMA 

'THE DEKALB STORY" 

N. I. S. COLLEGE FIELD— JUNE 12-13-14-15-16, 1956—8:15 P.M. 

A JOHN B. ROGERS PRODUCTION 

PRODUCED IN CONJUNCTION WITH 

THE DE KALB CENTENNIAL, Inc. 

M. QUAY ALFRED H. SRNKA 

FOR THE JOHN B. ROGERS CO. 
****** 

Synopsis oj Scenes 



Manager 



Director 



THE PROLOGUE 

A brilliant scene in which "The Queen of the 
DeKalb Centennial" welcomes visitors from every 
corner of the Nation. Surrounded by beautiful lad- 
ies of her Court, the Queens Cadets, Sailorettes, and 
the Guard of Honor, she greets representatives of 
the Forty-Eight States. 



EPISODE FOUR 
"The New Frontier" 

In 1818 Illinois became a State. As soon as the 
land was officially opened adventurous souls set 
out to seek a new home on the frontier. 



EPISODE ONE 
"This Is DeKalb" 

A salute to the pioneers of DeKalb who, with 
flashing axes, felled the growth of timber in order 
to found a new settlement in the New Land of 
Promise. 



EPISODE FIVE 
"Remember the Sabbath" 

When the first settlers came to this land, they 
brought not only their determination and courage, 
but another priceless gift, their faith in God. 



EPISODE TWO 
"The Heritage of Freedom" 

Beneath the tall trees of DeKalb, the Indians 
paused in their meanderings to camp and hunt. 
Here they prayed for fertility, danced to appease 
their Gods, and carry on their family life. 



EPISODE SIX 
"The Dawn of Education" 

As the area increased in population, education 
became a subject of great consideration to the peo- 
ple of DeKalb. From the crude surroundings of a 
simple beginning to the fine system of schools to- 
day, DeKalb has progressed in its march toward 
a higher educational standard. 



EPISODE THREE 
"The Indian War" 

One of the great Indian Chiefs known in this sec- 
tion of the Country was Shobbona. He made two 
midnight rides to warn the early settlers of im- 
pending danger with the lllini tribe. 



EPISODE SEVEN 
"The Coming of the Iron Horse" 

The first train arrives, two ribbons of steel now 
connect with the rest of the nation. The first rail- 
road to be built to DeKalb was the Galena & Chi- 
cago Union. It was completed to DeKalb on Aug- 
ust 12, 1835. 



EPISODE EIGHT 
"Wor Between the States" 

Event followed event — The Southern States se- 
ceded from the Union one by one. The notion was 
undergoing the stress of turmoil of a Civil War. 



EPISODE FOURTEEN 
"The Rooring Twenties" 

1927 — Prosperity abounded, it was the age of 
"Yes, We Hove No Bananas," "Plus Fours" and 
"Flappers." A dance sensation hit the nation and 
everyone in DeKalb was doing the Charleston. 



EPISODE NINE 
"Barb Wire" 

One of the most perplexing problems of the ag- 
ricultural industry in the early days was that of 
fencing. Glidden, Ellwood and Haish will long be 
be remembered for their contributions to the Wire 
Industry and helping DeKalb to become known as 
"Barb City." 



EPISODE FIFTEEN 
"The Seige for Freedom" 

When the startling news that come to the United 
States on that quiet afternoon of December 7, 1 94 1 , 
war came to the United States for the second time 
in generation. 



EPISODE TEN 
"Bikes and Bustles and Moustaches" 

It was the era of "The Bicycle Built for Two," 
"Leg 0' Mutton Sleeves," and "Wasp-Like Waists" 
.... "Pull Down Your Vest," and "23 Skidoo" 
were the forerunners of the slang terms of today. 
The innovation called the "Horseless Carriage" 
made its appearance and caused quite a sensation. 
All good clean fun of "Gay 90's" reminiscent of 
the days when "Grandma" was in her teens. 



EPISODE ELEVEN 
'The Founding of N. I. S. 



C." 



Perhaps one of the most significant facts in De- 
Kalb in 1899 was the completion of one of the 
finest colleges in Northern Illinois, Northern Illi- 
nois State Normal School. 



EPISODE TWELVE 
"The Haish Fire" 

In May, 1914, fire broke out in the point room 
of the Haish Manure Spreader Factory and ulti- 
mately engulfed two City blocks. 



EPISODE SIXTEEN 
"The Hall of Fame" 

In the past century, DeKalb has produced many 
fine Americans. This evening we would like to 
honor three of its prominent sons who hove con- 
tributed so much to the City, Country and County. 



EPISODE SEVENTEEN 
"The Atomic Age" 

With the orrival of the forties came Man's 
Knowledge of splitting the atom. This he used for 
o defensive measure, a method of destruction which 
heretofore hod been unknown and unequalled. To- 
day, man is striving to use the atom for Peace- 
time progress. Will it be the beginning of a new 
advanced civilization or the destructive end? 



EPISODE EIGHTEEN 
"Young America" 

Here is the future of America. Here is the fu- 
ture of DeKalb. Upon these young Americans will 
rest the responsibility for the moral, spiritual and 
educational development of our nation. 



EPISODE THIRTEEN 
"To the Cause for Freedom" 

The year was 1914, and again the people of De- 
Kalb heard the troubling sounds of war in the mak- 
ing. The climax come in 1917 when the Lusitonio 
was sunk and the United States entered the War. 



FINALE 

There are no bounds or limits to the frontiers 
of freedom. Now the darkness and wilderness are 
far behind. Ahead lies new boundaries, widening, 
expanding, certain to roll back before the some un- 
quenchable spirit of which we are heirs. As prod- 
ucts of a pioneer people, it is ours to go forward, 
to surmount the obstacles, to keep the faith. So, 
Proudly We Hail DeKalb's Second Century. 



SISTERS OF THE SWISH CHAPTERS 
DeKalb, Illinois Centennial— 1856 to 1956 



CHARTER NAME OF 

NO. NAME OF CHAPTER ORGANIZATION 

1 a — Fabulous-Flouncy-Floozies — Gen. Electric Co. 

Building No. 4 
b — Calico Queens — Gen. Electric Co., 1st shift 
c — Jezebelles — Gen. Electric Co., Office 
d — Crinoline Crimpers — Gen. Electric Co., Plant 

(2nd Shift) 
1A Krazy-Dazy-Domes — Women of the Moose 

2 Gingham Girls — Glidden P. T. A. 

3 Calico-Cut-Up — Haish P. T. A. 

4 Ducky Bonnet Belles — V. of F. Wars Auxiliary 

5 Century Belles — Cyclone Fence 

6 Knit-A-Biddies — Knit-A-Bit Club 

7 Legion Lasses — American Legion Auxiliary 

8 Chintz Charmers — Christian Science Group 

9 Beta Belles — Beta Sigma Phi 

10 Centennial Belles — Neighborhood Clan 
I 1 Army Belles — Salvation Army 

12 Ballot Box Belles — League of Women Voters 

13 Boptists of Yesteryear — First Baptist Church 

14 Barbie Bustles — D.T.H.S. Girls 

15 Beauty Belles — Chamberlain Beauty Nook 

16 Belles of South 2nd Street — Neighborhood Group 
1 7 Belles of St. Mary's — St. Mary's Church 

18 Better Halves — N.I.S.C. Student Wives 

19 Birthday Bustle Biddies — Bridge Club 

20 B-P-ettes — Business & Professionol Women's Club 

21 Bustle Rustlers — DeKalb Mothers' Club 

22 Calico Cats — Social Group 

23 Castle Queens — N.I.S.C. Service Employees 

24 Centennial Centrals — DeKolb-Ogle Telephone 

25 Centennial Key Notes — Rudolph Wurlitzer Co. 

26 Chalis Sallies — Littlejohn P. T. A. 

27 Coltonville Country Cuties — 

Coltonville Community Club 

28 C- & E. Trailerettes — Corey & Evans 

29 Covered Wagon Wheels — D. & S. Pinochle Club 

30 Crinoline Belles — Brody Factory 

31 Daisies Won't Tell — P. E.G. Chapter DX 

32 Dames of the Bonnet — DeKalb Womans Club 

33 Daughters of DeKalb — Catholic Daughters 

of America 

34 DeKalb Doozies — Social Group 

35 D.P.H. Sisters — DeKalb Hospital Benefit Club 

36 DeKalb Trustetts — DeKalb Trust & Savings Bank 

37 Dinner Belles — Supper Club 

38 Dodgett Daisies — Social Group 

39 Drama Dears — Drama Club 

40 Ellwood Ellas — Ellwood P.T.A. 

41 Faculty Femmes — Dames Club — N.I.S.C. 

Faculty Wives 



CHARTER 
NO. 

42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 

50 
51 

52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 



82 
83 
84. 
85 
86 
87 



NAME OF 
NAME OF CHAPTER ORGANIZATION 

Farm Bureau Fillies — Form Bureau 

First Voter Gals — Leogue of Women Voters 

Flippin Jennies — Chain Ten Club 

Frontier Frills — Social Group 

Gay Gals — H.S. Class of 1950 

Goal Post Swishes — Goal Post Restaurant 

Home & School Belles — High School P.T.A. 

Homemakers of DeKalb County Home — 

DeKalb County Home 
Hospital Chimes — St. Mary's Hospital Auxiliory 
Immanuel Pioneers — Immanuel English Lutheran 

Church 
Jane & Jean Twirlers — Square Dance Group 
Jane Parker Girls — A. & P. Store 
Jolly Gold Diggers — Jolly Twelve Club 
Junabelles — Junior Woman's Club 
Kiddie Kuddlers — DeKalb Community Mothers' Club 
Kissin' Kuzzins — Sociol Group 
Lucio Sisters — Social Group 
Mom Street Molls — Business Women 
Mayflower Maidens — Congregational Church 
Merry Marthas — Four Square Gospel Church 
Merry Maids & Matrons — McMurry P.T.A. 
Neptune Daughters — Barb City Boot Club 
Nightingales — DeKalb Registered Nurses Club 
Northern Belles — Northern Illinois Corporation 
Patriotic Pols — Women's Patriotic Association 
Pokorettes — Social Group 
Ruffled Does — Lady Elks 
Shrine Belles — DeKalb White Shrine 47 
South Side Sals — Social Group 
Spaghetti Swishes — Jon & Jen's Grill 
Stage Struck Sisters — Stage Coach Players 
Star Sisters — Eastern Star Club 

Suburban Sunbonnet Suzzies — Tilton Park Residents 
Sunbonnet Lassies — Home Bureau — P.M. Group 
Suomi Sisters — Social Group 

Swirls of the Swish — Notional Hairdressers Assn. 
Swish Teens — Junior High 
The Cabinettes — Log Cabin Group 
Tilton Tillies — Tilton Pork Group 
Twentieth Century Pioneers — 20th Century Club 
Vinkingettes — Ladies of the Viking 
Wagon Wheels — DeKalb Commercial Body Corp. 
Wesley Calico Gals — Methodist Women 
Wurl-Wins — Rudolph Wurlitzer Co. — Office 
Yankee Doodle Gals — Women's Relief Corps 
McMurry Sixteen Swishes — McMurry 7th-8th 

Children 
Mel's Musical Belles — Mel Elliott Music Center 
Blue Belles — Altar and Rosary Society 



CAST FOR "THE DE KALB STORY' 



Trumpeters — 

Edgor Knodle 
Bonnie LoVcn 



PROLOGUE 

Nansen Glidden Woite Embree 

Roberta Shawver 
Donna DeGraffenried 



Sponsored by Explorers Post 18, 28, 15, S, and Girl Scouts 
Troop 26, Sycamore and Troop 1, DeKalb 



Cadets — 

Judy McCann 
Kathryn Hildebrandt 
Judy Healey 
Sandra Entwistle 
Karen Johnson 
Caroline Hoppe 

Sailorettes — 

Dolly Beaumont 
Kay Mathre 
Marg Hayter 
Mavis Chaplin 
Phyllis Prather 
Miriam Montavon 
(Margaret Schiesser) 

Stotes — 

Beverly Roberts 
Sherlynd Baird 
Veria Sprott 
Down Mathre 
Carol Hokola 
Janice Read 

Girl Scouts — 

Nancy MocGinnitie 
Potty Smith 
Marcia Olson 
Kathy Baker 
Jule Miller 
Sarah Glidden 
Barbaro Plopp 
Corol Cutts 
Mary Lee Wright 

Boy Scouts — 

Michael Suttie 
Bob Myers 
Roger Kelly 
Bob Bowman 



Horesmen — 

June Threstod 
Bud Smith 
Gordon Plucker 
Tom Anderson 
Tom Gallagher 
Jerry Bemis 
Bob Trotter 



Ruth Ann Johnston 
Sandra Burch 
Judy Jobe 
Susie Poulus 
Kay Morris 
Borb Suddeth 



Karen Schavlond 
Anita Bullington 
Jackie Schoenholz 
Sharon Tomas 
Dorothy Kcehler 
Connie Kensiki 



Judy Jackman 
Merijo Farley 
Bonnie Butler 
Wanda Stroyan 
Sandy Napier 
Ann Madison 



Susan Chambers 
Sharon Myrlari 
Judy Wahl 
Karen Bend 
Potty Berkley 
Karen Munson 
Kathy Shepordson 
Alice Soar 
Andreos Foriss 



Dan Anderson 
Dave Royalty 
John Luhtala 
Dove Bogonrief 
Steve Tetmeyer 



Loren Mullins 
Sam Cushin 
Morgen Johnson 
Dick GoMagher 
Johnny Pigott 
Bob Suddeth 
Fred Busse 



EPISODE 1 
"This Is DeKalb" 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark Worner Mary Cloir McGirr 
Earl Warner Emmy Lou McGirr 



EPISODE 2 
"Heritage of Freedom" 

Karen Lindstrom 
Karen Johnson 
Janice Read 
Pot Ridolph 



Pat Roach 
Gary Foriss 
Harold Thorn 
John Thorn 
Ronnie Carey 
Lee Homon 
Roger Henson 



Girl Scout Troop 26- 

Jone Moore 
Solly Clarner 
Karen Kretzschmcr 



Indian Dancers - 

Karen Klosing 
Bonnie Schmidt 
Donno Ulery 
Sharon Richie 
Connie Lynch 
Cynthia Stevens 



-Sycor 



"Skip" Boyes 
Keith Kempson 
Bill Arnold 
Robin Bosworth 
Bill Moeller 
John Randall 
Lorry Berke 
Jim Ellis 



lore 

Joanne Finn 
Keren Kuhl 
Jean Parker 



Vernetto Smith 
Cynthia Smith 
Phebe Countryman 
Karen Simmons 
Orva Johnson 
Ruth Ann Hynes 



EPISODE 3 

"The Indian War" 

Same as the Cast of Episode 2 



EPISODE 4 
"The New Frontier" 

Sponsore by Sisters of the Swish Chapters, Flippin Jennies, 
Jane and Jean Twirlers, and Centennial Belles and Beaux 



Bill and Florence Nichols 
Bea and Cliff Myers 
Deino and Dick Kozlowshi 
Ron and Joyce Rogers 
George and Florence Bloyd 
Don and Betty Schou 
Loron and Clara Harmes 
Clarence Divine and 
Mildred Lehman 
Garrel and Esther Davis 
Pete and Nancy Paholy 
Bill and Edna Shields 
Joe and Jennie Stossel 
Russell and Juanito Roland 
George and Mary Munch 
Bill Johnson 
Beverly Cole 

Alternates — 

Howard and Mildred Eychaner 

Children's Set 

Jerry Shields 
Wayne Davis 
Bruce Paholy 



Roger Shields 
Patsy Koziowski 
Barbara Forest 
Dionne Perusse 
Suzanne Perusse 

Alternates 

Gene Shields 
Arline Davis 

Centennial Belles and Beaux 

John and Betty Miller 
Roger ond Frances Gustafson 
Ronald Cross and Ruth Taylor 
Jock Cross and 

Charlotte Anthenate 

Children's Set 

Harold Thorn 
John Thorn 
Arlo Bloyd 
Richord Lehman 
Barbara Myrick 
Lindo Myrick 
Jeanne Perusse 
Priscilla Lehman 



Jim Long 
Ken Budrow 
Wayne Mosher 
Ron Teogue 



EPISODE 5 
"Remember the Sabbath" 

Some OS the Cast of Episode 4 



EPISODE 6 
"The Dawn of Education" 

Sponsored by The Solvation Army 
(SCHOOL SCENE) 



Giris — 

Jean Pondelick 
Linda Pondelick 
Ada King 
Pat Lay 

Carol Chambers 
Joy Chambers 
Alice Humes 
Alice Chambers 



Boys — 

Ralph Duncan 
Melvin Duncan 
Eddie Emberson 
Kenny Hayes 
Teddy Higgins 
Daniel King 
Carl Votaw 
Ronold Votow 



EPISODE 11 
'The Founding of N. I. S. C." 

Sponsored by Kiwonis Club 



Vere Goodyeor 
Edgar Knodle 
Chauncey Watson 
Mrs. A. Oderkirk 
Ward Miller 



Mrs. Ward Miller 
Morge Lymon 
George Boardman 
Wm. O'Connell 



EPISODE 12 
"The Haish Fire" 



EPISODE 7 
"The Coming of the Iron Horse" 

Mr. and Vrs. Joe Wiltberger, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Leed 

Sharon and Steven and Linda 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ziegler Doc Mohrman, Mike, John 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Kahle and Janet 

and Lynn Mrs. Horry Wollin 



EPISODE 13 
"To the Cause for Freedom" 

Sponsored by The American Legion 



Fred Swigley 
Leonard Stigliani 
Roy Wing 



Ray Corey 
George Bennett 
Mrs. Nettie Wing 



EPISODE 8 
"War Between the Stotes' 



EPISODE 14 
"The Roaring Twenties' 



Jim Brooks 
Marty Steinberg 
George Olsen 
Bruce Blasch 
Richard Hynes 
Lorry Boll 



Jim Kirby 
Bill Carney 
Craig Lloyd 
Steve Brickley 
Bill Snyder 
Tom Wood 



EPISODE 9 
"Barb Wire" 



EPISODE 10 
'Bikes, Bustles, and Moustaches" 



German Bond — 

Alan Roselieb 
Arnold Lehto 
Robert Engstrom 
Howard Olson 
Dave Schroeder 
Brad Bluhm 
Dean Pearson 
Floyd Schroeder 
Worren Porter 

Goy Nineties — 

Ed McGirr 

Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Wilkins 

Jim Carney 

Sue Corney 

Bill Windle 

Alice Heathcote 

Beverly Cole 

Bill Johnson 

Janet Thompson 

Mary Lyons 

Dale Morshall 

Gerry Ball 

Aarne Anderson 

Joan Hickman 

Denny McGirr 

Jim Scott 

June Fogenbush, 

Moryann, Bennie 
Eloine Grahm, Mike 

Karen 



Alice Hartwig, Louise Reams 

Leon Listy 

Bev ond Tom Cliffe, Charles 

John, Jim and Joe 
Patricia Gallagher 
Pat Turk 
Ken Moore 
Dionne Waltz 

See-Sow Girls — By Heloine 
Donee Studio 

Jane Gallagher 
Helen Rohlik 
Jacky Simmons 
Jane Raymond 
Sharon Hynes 
Joyce Klasing 
Koren Hendrickson 
Sharon Gorman 
Bernice Johnson 
Jeon Stonesifer 
Kaye Kittleson 
Sondy Kohler 

Con-Con Girls — By DeKolb Ag 

Beverly McArtor 
Beverly Wascher 
Barbara Russell 
Ginnie Dietz 
Millie Sulaver 
Fran Hawkins 
Shirley Lee 



Chorleston Dancers' 

Vernetta Smith 
Cynthia Smith 
Phebe Countryman 
Karen Simmons 



-By Heloine Dance Studio 

Orva Johnson 
Bonnie Schmidt 
Sharon Richie 
Cynthia Stevens 



EPISODE 15 
"The Siege for Freedom" 

Sponsored by The American Legion 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Clark and Children 
Mono, Skippy, Tubby, and Richard 



Jerome Berkes 
John Hilbert 
Robert Copehart 



Evan Owens 
James Schoo 



EPISODE 16 
"Hall of Fame" 



Mrs. Eugenie Walker 
Mr. Tom Joneway 
Mr. James Maldrum 



Mr. John Lloyd 
Mrs. Beulah Hoyter 



EPISODE 17 
"The Atomic Age" 

Sponsored by the Kiwonis 

Al Oderkirk Irving Rissman 

Dean Lyman 



EPISODE IS 

"Young America" 

Cost from Episode 1 and 8 

FINALE 
The Entire Cast 



NARRATION BY 

Mrs. Ann Smith Gray Robert Finan 

Mrs. Eugenie Wolker Rev. William D. 

Miss Edith Wenfworth Dr. John Lloyd- 



White 
•Guest 



Program of Daily Events 
DEKALB CENTENNIAL 



SUNDAY, JUNE 10 
Centennial Religious Dedication Day 

Morning 

Centennial observances in DeKalb Churches. Theme: 
Past, Present and Future Religious Endeavor in DeKalb. 

Evening 

8:00 p. m. All Faith Centennial Service— Hopkins 
Park. Special music by DeKalb Municipal Band and 
combined choirs of DeKalb Churches. Centennial ad- 
dress by Dr. Francis Geigle, Northern Illinois State 
College." 



' MONDAY, JUNE 11 

Industry-Education Day 

All Day 

Industrial-Education display by DeKalb Industries — 
DeKalb Junior High School. 

Evening 

6:00 p. m. — Industry-Education Day dinner — Address 
by Earl J. Johnson, vice president, United Press Assn., 
presentation of National Industrial leaders. Presenta- 
tion of awards for Junior Achievements by Robert 
Smith. 

9:00 p. m.— Centennial Ball — College Gym. Music by 
Russ Carlyle. Coronation of DeKalb Centennial Queen 
and presentation of her Court of Honor. 



TUESDAY, JUNE 12 

Young America Day 

Morning 

10:00 a. m. — Children's Centennial Parade — Downtown 
DeKalb. 

Afternoon 

1:00 p. m. — Games, Races and Contests for small fry 
— North College Field. Awards for winners — free re- 
freshments for all participants. 

3:30 p. m. — Little League All-Star Game — Little 
League Diamond. 

3:30 p. m. — Teen Ager Matinee Dance — "Hi-Time To 
Coke" — Gilbert Hall. Featuring Adrienne Falcon, Chi- 
cago disc jockey. 

Evening 

7:30 p. m. — Pre-pageant entertainment — Pageant Field, 
N. I. S. C. 

8:15 p. m. — Premier presentation of the huge histori- 
cal pageant-spectacle "THE DE KALB STORY," with 
fireworks finale. 

10:00 p. m. — Street Dancing — Downtown DeKalb — two 
locations. 



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13 
Ladies' Day 

Afternoon 

1:00 p. m. — Fashion Show, "Styles of Yesterday and 
Today" — N. I. S. C. Island — Maggie Dady, guest nar- 
rator and commentator. Presentation of visiting dig- 
nitaries. 

2:30 p. m.— Ladies Centennial Tea and Art Show — 
Presentation of winning costumes — Sisters of the Swish, 
Gilbert Hall Lawn, N. I. S. C. 

Evening 

7:30 p. m. — Presentation of Awards — Sisters of the 
Swish — Pageant Stage. 

8:15 p. m. — Second performance of the pageant-spec- 
tacle, "THE DEKALB STORY," with fireworks finale. 

10:00 p. m. — Free street dancing — Downtown DeKalb 
— two locations. 



THURSDAY, JUNE 14 
Pioneer and Homecoming Day 

All Day 

Registration of Pioneers, visitors, and former resi- 
dents at Centennial Headquarters. 

Afternoon 

2:00 p. m. — Pioneer and homecoming recognition cere- 
mony, Hopkins Park. Recognition of oldest pioneers, 
of longest residence, and former residents coming long- 
est distance. Presentation of U. S. Senator Everett 
Dirksen, and introduction of other dignitaries. Centen- 
nial address by The Honorable William G. Stratton, 
Governor of Illinois. 

Evening 

6:30 p. m.— Golden Belles and Beaux Dinner — Rice 
Hotel, honoring DeKalb couples who have observed 
their 50th wedding anniversary. 

7:45 p. m. — Presentation of Pioneer awards by Sena- 
tor Dirksen. 

8:15 p. m. — Third performance of the Pageant-Spec- 
tacle, "THE DEKALB STORY," with fireworks finale. 



10:00 p. m.- 
locations. 



-Street dancing — Downtown DeKalb — two 



FRIDAY, JUNE 15 
Rural Day 

All Day 

Exhibit of Agricultural Relics — Hopkins Park. 

Morning 

10:30 a. m. — Safe Driving Demonstration — Ninth Street 
off Sycamore Road. 

12:00 Noon — Old Fashioned Family Picnic — Hopkins 
Park. 



Afternoon 

1:15 p. m.— Salute to Agricultural Progress— Address 
by Lloyd Burlingame, Station WLS.— Presentation of 
Agricultural Dignitaries. 

Evening 

7:30 p. in.— Final Judging— Brothers of the Brush— 
10 classes — presentation of awards — Pageant Stage. 

8:15 p. m. — Fourth presentation — Pageant Spectacle — 
"THE DE KALB STORY," with fireworlts finale. 

10:00 p. m. — Free Street Dancing — Downtown DeKalb 
— two locations. 



SATURDAY, JUNE 16 
Faith In Our Future Day 

Morning 

9:30 a. m. — Judging of Antique Vehicles. 

9:30 a. m. — Time Capsule Ceremony — DeKalb Public 
Library. 

10:30 a. m. — Beard Shaving Contest — Brothers of the 
Brush, Downtown DeKalb. Prizes to be awarded. 

Afternoon 

1:00 p. m. — Feature attraction of the celebration — 
Huge Centennial Parade— "SALUTE TO A CENTURY" 
500 floats, 40 bands. Theme: From the past to the future. 

4:30 p. m.— Display of Floats— DeKalb High School. 

Evening 

7:30 p. in. — Prepageant entertainment. 

8:15 p. m. — Final performance of the pageant-specta- 
cle, "THE DE KALB STORY," with tremendous fire- 
works finale. 



****** 

ALL WEEK 

Imperial Shows — Centennial Midway 

Historic Window Displays — Downtown DeKalb 



DE KALB CENTENNIAL QUEEN CONTESTANTS 

As this booklet goes to press, the DeKolb Cen- 
tennial Queen and her ten attendants in the Court 
of Honor, have not been selected. The citizens of 
DeKalb, however, may well pay tribute in appre- 
ciation of the following Queen Candidates whose 
civic spirit, energy and ingenuity were a major con- 
tribution to the success of the DeKalb Centennial; 



Nancy Acher 

Barbara Anderson 

Mrs. Barbara Anderson 

Evelyn Anderson 

Judy Anderson 

Mrs. Scott Anderson 

Charlotte Anthenat 

Carole Askelson 

Janice Averill 

Sharon Baker 

Judy Barrett 

Mrs. Susan Brayton 

Joan Carter 

Dolores Charlesworth 

Joan Christiansen 

Carol Clausen 

Joyce Cook 

Mory Ellyn Derix 

Elois Desponett 

Peggy J. Doctor 

Lorna Donnelly 

Pat Frederick 

Judith Fuller 

Verna Gorman 

Pat J. Gaston 

Mary Hayter 

Janet Holmes 

Juanita R. Norton 

Barbara Borine Hunt 

Pat Hunt 

Sue Hutchinson 

Mrs. Dennis Johnson 

Marion Johnson 

Marilyn Johnson 

Orva Johnson 

Pat Kahle 

Dorothy Kimbell 

Kangaroo Court — 

Clarence Wales 
Chuck Moser 
Joe Stossel 

F. E . Schundler & Co. 
Hollgren Lumber Co., Inc. 
Somonauk Saw Mills 
Builders & Lumber Supply 
Curt Bogle 



Georgia Kirby 

Nancy Kittleson 

Marilyn Kuusisto 

Marjorie Lawson 

Mary Lou Lee 

Bonnie Less 

Carol Morcheschi 

Joan Marshall 

Billie McFall 

Jonoan McGirr 

Carol Montavon 

Miriam Montavon 

Deanecia Mantgares (Genesa) 

Joan Myers 

Sandy Myers 

Kay Mullis 

Mary O'Brien 

Marion Panttila 

Joonne Raddatz 

Lois Randall 

Florence Marie Rauworth 

Mrs. Hal Riehle 

Sharon Ritchie 

Sally Rogers 

Jean Rohlik 

Carol Taylor 

Mary Ann Sanderson 

Mrs. Walter Sanderson 

Jane Smith 

Vernetta Smith 

Doris Stork 

Mildred Sulaver 

Rita Sullivon 

Carol Swanson 

Donna Swanson 

Yvonne Swedberg 

Margie Voss 



Clark Cryor 

Kallal Sheet Metol Shop 

Bill Shields 

DeKalb Fire Dept. 

Gordon Hardware 

Dick Thorsen 

Roger Jacobs 



UNIQUE FEATURE OF AN OUTSTANDING CELEBRATION 




One of the many unusual features of the DeKalb Centennial — features which distinguish it from 
the many other Centennials that are celebrated across the country each year — is the outstanding head- 
quarters building. This building was constructed by the DeKalb Centennial Committee exclusively for 
use during the Centennial. 

The key element in the development of the idea for a special building for Centennial headquarters 
was the outstanding cooperation evidenced by local citizens who contributed freely of their labor, time, 
money, and building materials to make the project possible. Many, many long hours of hard work 
went into thee building, and the following who gave in one way or another toward its construction — 
have contributed significantly to the success of the DeKalb Centennial: 



Carpenters: 

Tom Crooke 
Anthony Romon 
Edward Johnson 
Scotty Buchon 
L. G. Antonsen 
Arthur Munson 
Andy Carter 
Lane Severson 
Lawrence Knutson 
Rodney Lotimer 
Arvo Nyrhilo 
Richard Solsrud 
Allen Swonson 
Curt Lovig 

Electricians — Forrest Struthers, 

Ernie Youngren 
DeLos Struthers 

Floors and Counters — 

Al Delano 



KENNETH HALLGREN— NEALE SKORBERG, Co-Chairmen 
PAUL JOHNSON, Foreman 

Painters — Algot Moline, Chair 



Arnold Johnson 
Charles Mosher 
Joe Stossel 
Arnold Steward 
Andy Josendole 
Everette Vodden 
Wayne McGill 
Wait Jacobson 
Toivo Riihimoki 
George Olsen 
Vern Hickerson 
Robert Morrison 
Williom Kirby 

Chairman 

Joy Word 
Enio Pontelo 



James Koyes 



Bror Eckberg 
Kenneth Lovell 
Sigfried Olson 
William Reynolds 
Helfred Nelson 

Donors and Loaners — 

Hallgren Lumber Co., Inc. 
Johnson & Jacobson 
Forrest Struthers 
Hub Electric Supply 
Delano Floor Covering 
Gloss & Key Shop 
Leo Todd DeKalb Roofing 
Doty Pre-Cast Steps 
B.P.O. Elks No. 765 
Oberlin Nursery 
Glidden Greenhouse 



George Olsen 



Kenneth Kidd 
Art Jacobson 
Holger Moline 
Howard Lovell 
Paul Peterson 



Hunt Feed Store 
Troop 1 8, Boy Scouts 
Troop 19, Girl Scouts 
Johnson Concrete Co. 
Rudolph Wurlitzer Co. 
DeKalb Blacksmith Shop 
Thorsen Sign Shop 
James F. Simon Co. 
General Electric Co. 
Hickman Office Equip. Co. 
Coco Cola Co. 



OTHER ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Centennial Committee also gratefully acknowledges the following persons and organizations 
without whose generous contributions of merchandise, services and money, the DeKalb Centennial could 
not have been the event it was. 

QUEEN CONTEST 

M. F. Molone Bimrose Furniture Store DeKalb Township 

Burch Jewelers Still's Drug Store Northern Illinois Gos Co. 

Duffy & Modeen The Charm Shop Montgomery Word Co. 

Skorberg Furniture Lehon's Drugs Tommy's Bike Shop 

Gordon Hardware DeKalb County Farm Bureau Station WLBK 



Pan American Airways 
DeKalb Chronicle 
Greenacre Cleaners 
Rudolph Wurlrtzer Company 
Joseph Brody & Brothers 
Gonterman Jewelers 



Karl's Music & Hobby Store 



AUTOGRAPHS 



CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 100th YEAR 




AMERICA'S FOREMOST FOOD RETAILER 
SINCE 1859 




Public Service Company office in 1906 



FLOWERS 
for all occasions 

DeKalb's Leading Florist 

JENSENS' 
DEKALB GREENHOUSE 

Phone 6-7151 



Electric Utilities 

DeKalb was not the first town in this area to 
have electric lights, as the neighboring town of 
Sycamore had this luxury in 1889. However, 
in 1891 John Glidden and S. E. Bradt establish- 
ed the first electric plant in DeKalb. 

This was located in the building now stand- 
ing on the northwest corner of Second and Lo- 
cust and at that time was used for a grist mill. 
The franchise was granted October 5, 1891. 
This was a sm.all 50 KW 110 volt plant and in 
1895 the present plant was built. 



PRAGERS FOOD STORE 

229 South First Street 

DeKalb, Illinois 

Phone 6-6632 



This was organized as the DeKalb Electric 
Company on June 11, 1895. In 1899 in con- 
junction with the idea of an interurban line the 
name was changed to DeKalb Sycamore Elec- 
tric Company. This in turn was purchased by 
the Springfield Gas & Electric Company in 
December 1921 and on January 13, 1922 it be- 
came the Illinois Power Company. This prop- 
erty was taken over by the Central Illinois 
Light Company and remained that until Jan- 
uary 1, 1956, when the present company. Pub- 
lic Service Company of Northern Illinois, took 
over. 



PEVONKA HEATING 

147 South First St. DeKalb, 111. 

FURNACE AND HEATING EQUIPMENT . . . Also 
FURNACE CLEANING AND SERVICE 



For Service Call 



Day 6-6637 - Night 6-2880 



DeKalb was one of the first town.s to have 
its water pumped by electric power. This oc- 
curred on October 8, 1894, when the city and 
the power company entered into a contract. 
Two days after the franchise was granted, the 
city and the light company entered into a con- 
tract for street lighting. It was specified that 
the lights were to be turned off at 11:00 p.m. 
unless clouds covered the moon, when they 
were to burn all night. On moonlight nights 
they were not turned on. 



Page 37 



Growing 26 Years With DeKalb 



Fruit and Vegetable Dealers 
Bananas a Specialty 



— ALL PHONES 6-4801 — 



GENE'S PRODUCE 



7th and Oak Sts. 



DeKalb. niinois 



K A R L'S 
MUSIC & HOBBY CENTER 

132 North Third St. 
DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



Public Utilities Gas 

Times change and so has the skyline of De- 
Kalb. Gone now are the two gas tanks at 14th 
and Market which marked the location of the 
gas plant. 

DeKalb's first use of manufactured gas came 
on September third, 1901, when the DeKalb 
County Gas Company turned gas into the mains 
for forty customers. 

However there was more behind the story 
than that. On December 14, 1895, the City 
Council granted a franchise to W. L. EUwood, 
A. W. Fisk, William Carter and C. F. Smith. 
These gentlemen did not build within the al- 
loted time so on October 13, 1900. the franchise 
was granted to Clinton E. Jackson. Mr. Jack- 
son in turn assigned his franchise to Irwin Rew 
who formed the DeKalb County Gas Company. 

At the same time that DeKalb received gas 
it was available in Sycamore through a four 
inch high pressure line built along the DeKalb 
Sycamore Road. 

The DeKalb County Gas Company continued 
in business until May 1, 1912, when it was pur- 
chased by the Illinois Northern Utilities Com- 
pany. At the same time the Illinois Northern 
purchased utilities in other towns. 

Changes were made in the DeKalb plant 
from time to time. The coal gas was changed 
to water gas and in 1941 and 1942 natural gas 
was introduced. This was made possible by 
the construction of a pipe line. This is a 
twenty inch main connecting with the main 
line at Geneseo, Illinois. 

December 15, 1950. the Illinois Northern was 
merged with the Public Service Company of 
Northern Illinois. A later change made the 
name Northern Illinois Gas Company. 

Today the company serves over 4000 custom- 
ers in the DeKalb - Svcamore area. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

CAMERAS . . . PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES 

PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

and 

HOBBIES 



Industry 

The early industries of the new town, natur- 
ally, were connected with barbed wire and 
agricultural products. The first industry was 
a grist mill located at Seventh Street, in 1853. 

In 1865 Andrew and Charles Bradt opened 
a glove factory which gave way to Bradt and 
Shipman Glove Company in 1870. Eleven years 
later, in 1876. the DeKalb Implement Works 
opened, and later it merged with the Barb City 
Manufacturing Company. 

Also in 1876 the wire mills started and for a 
long time dominated the industrial life of the 
town. In the latter half of the 1890's kindred 
factories made their appearances. 

Jacob Haish expanded his factories to in- 
clude not only barbed wire, but also plows, 
small implements, gasoline engines and manure 



Page 38 



r 



-^imf"^ 



f^^'^fi f^f^dfpf^--'-"^/— f;Mfe?^fj?L^ ''jpj^TwmK . 



'^Avjfr Jl 



lin n^ 1 I i "! ^ 



*«^|^^-.^,Jh.4i^ 



•^^ 






M. D. Wells Shoe Company 



spreaders, 
operation. 



At one time he had three plants in 



The DeKalb Fence Company was formed in 
1892, and as an off-shoot the Union Fence Com- 
pany was organized later. In the end they 
were both taken over by the American Steel and 
Wire Company. Also in 1892 the Abram Ell- 
wood Manufacturing Company built a plant on 
Pleasant Street, which later was taken over by 
the American Steel and Wire Company and is 
now used by the Cyclone Fence Company. The 
Ellwood Company went out of existence in 
about 1902. 

On the other side of town the Leonard-At- 
kinson Shoe Company constructed the building 
now housing the DeKalb Commercial Body 
Company. This was in 1891, but a few years 
later the M. D. Wells Shoes Company purchas- 
ed the business and manufactured shoes there 
until 1911. 

In 1912 the Sycamore Wagon Company mov- 
ed to DeKalb, changing its name to DeKalb 



Wagon Company and occupying the shoe fac- 
tory building. It specialized in making milk 
delivery wagons. A year later it purchased a 
truck factory and moved it to DeKalb. The 
company manufactured trucks of all kinds, 
including some fire trucks for surrounding cit- 
ies. DeKalb's third fire truck was made in 
that plant. 

In 1940 the company's name was changed to 
DeKalb Commercial Body Company and the 
company began to specialize in the manufac- 
ture of bodies for trucks. 

The years 1905 and 1906 saw two new plants 
open in DeKalb, the Melville Clark Piano Com- 
pany and the Creamery Package Manufactur- 
ing Company. The Melville Clark Piano Com- 
pany's first instrument came off the assembly 
line on May 6, 1905. In 1919 the company was 
merged with the Rudolph Wurlitzer Company 
which operates it today. 

The Creamery Package Manufacturing Corn- 



Page 39 




Looking West from Second Street in 1894 



pany was started in 1906 and has been a steady 
factor in DeKalb's industrial life ever since. 
It manufactures commercial refrigeration units. 

Other industries in the pre World War I era 
were the Kohler Die and Specialty Company; 
Vasser Swiss Underwear Company; Standard 
Foundry, which made furnaces, and other com- 
panies which filled a need at the time but are 
not in existence at present. 

After 1918 DeKalb had the California Pack- 
ing Corporation for canning corn and peas, the 
Cyclone Fence Company in 1930, for making 
screen wire ; the Englander Company, for 
manufacturing springs, and the Joseph Brody 
and Brothers, for making ladies' coats. 

In 1916 one of DeKalb's steadiest factories 
was started. In that year the Nehring Electri- 
cal Wire Company opened in the Haish build- 
ing on Lincoln Highway. Since then it has e.x- 
panded and occupies this building and one on 
Locust and Ninth Streets. It makes insulated 
wire for the electrical industry. 

During the World War II period all the 
plants in DeKalb were engaged in war work. 
The Wurlitzer Company made wooden air- 
planes which were assembled by the Interstate 
Aircraft and Manufacturing Company; the 
DeKalb Commercial Body Company made sig- 
nal Corps equipment, and the Northern Illinois 
Corporation went into the manufacturing of 
tank treads. 

Following the war one of DeKalb's biggest 
industries — the General Electric Company — 
came to town. It makes fractional horsepower 
motors. It purchased the building erected by 
the Arlington Furniture Company in 1941 and 
occupied by Interstate during the war. 

Page 40 



HA 



S 

RDWARg 



FOR OVER 
12 YEARS 

!; hai been our privilege and pleasure to have a 
part in Ihe growth and expansion of DeKalb's 100 
years of progress. 

As DeKalb's leading hardware and houseware sup- 
plier, it will be our earnest and constant endeavor 
to prove ourselves worthy of your continued confi- 
dence during the years to come. 



540 East Lincoln Highway 
DeKalb, Illinois Phone 6-2542 



Congratulations 
On The 100th Anniversary 

DONALD M. AMOS 

INSURANCE AGENCY 



The Agency where cusfomers 
send their friends" 



637 E. Lincoln Hwy. 



Phone 6-2787 



CREAMERY PACKAGE — An impressive history pointing 

toward continued progress in the future 



• DeKalb factory erected in 1906 for the full manufacture of 
refrigeration machinery. 

• Additions to the factory in 1923, 1938, 1955, and 1956. 

• Manufacturers of — 

Refrigeration machinery and related equipment 
Refrigerated stainless steel bulk milk cooling tanks 
Stainless steel utility tables 
Work tables and wash sinks 



THE CREAMERY PACKAGE MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



Page 41 




Building on Northeast corner, Second Street and Lincoln 
Highway, in 1890's 

Stores 

Ever since John Goodall and Baisl Ruby 
opened the first stores in the settlement of 
Huntley's Grove, DeKalb has been a good town 
in which to trade. The above mentioned stores 
were the first in the growing community and 
were built in 1849. They were on opposite 
corners of Depot (Lincoln Highway) and First 
Streets. The Goodall store was on the site of 
the Chronicle building and Ruby's across the 
street. 

We cannot trace the growth of the individual 
stores, but by 1870 there were several along the 
dirt Main Street. A destructive fire in the early 
1870's wiped out these wooden buildings and 
new brick structures took their places. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

On Your 

ONE HUNDREDTH 

ANNIVERSARY 



SUNBEAM BREAD 



CRYDUN PHOTOGRAPHS 

SHERMAN DUNKELBERGER 

Portrait 
Commercial Photography 

128 N. THIRD ST. — DEKALB, ILLINOIS 
PHONE G-5711 



In 1876 Joseph Glidden built his Glidden 
House on the northeast corner of Second Street, 
I. L. Ellwood built a stone building on the cor- 
ner to the south and P. C. Wagner built his 
building on the northwest corner of that inter- 
section. 



To complete the picture the Eagle Hotel, 
Page 42 



CENTENNIAL GREETINGS 

PEARSON'S 
TAVERN 



156 E. Lincoln Hwy. 



DeKalb, Illinois 



DE K ALB'S 
LEADING DEPARTMENT STORE 

J. C. PENNEY CO. 



Congratulations 
BABSON FARMS Inc. 




Haish Bee Hive Building, |. C. Penny corner, before razing 
in 1937 

built in 1846, occupied the other corner. 

From that da.v onward the main street was 
built up rapidly. Some of the firms which oc- 
cupied these stores were Aaron Goldsmith, 
clothier, who occupied the "Bee Hive" built by 
Mr. Haish in 1885 on the southwest corner of 
Third and Lincoln Highway. Atwood and 
Burnside were in the building on the other cor- 
ner. I. L. Ellwood's hardware store, and its 
successors were located where the National 
store is today. V. A. Glidden's grocery was in 
the Glidden House, Walter White's meatmar- 
ket near there, and other stores lined the street. 

There have been several stores which have 
been known far beyond the limits of DeKalb. 
The Anderson Brothers store started in 1895 
and sold men's clothing to people from all over 
Northern Illinois. They were located where 
Bowman's is today and later took over the 
building next to it. This company went out of 
business in 1922. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

T O 

DE K ALB, ILLINOIS 

ON YOUR 100th BIRTHDAY 

TRANSCON LINES 

2611 S. Halsted St., Chicago, 111. DA 6-5100 



E. A. Shetter, .ieweler, with his famous slo- 
gan "Talk To Shetter" blazoned on barns, be- 
came a magnet for his line. Lon Smith, who 
asked "Who's Your Butcher?" was well known 
in the outlying areas. In the early 1920's the 
Striglos brothers opened a deluxe restaurant 
known as the "Innovation" in the Commercial 
Trades Building while across the street was a 
restaurant operated by Jack Cook known as 
the "Aggravation." 

Beside the Eagle Hotel and the Glidden 
House DeKalb had the Walkup, located at var- 
ious places, and one on the corner of Fourth 
and Lincoln (site of the Kennedy Building) 
known variously as the Rickard House, the 
Clifton and the European. On May 30, 1927 
Mr. M. E. Rice opened DeKalb's newest hotel 
— The Rice. 



Page 43 




Haish Corner. Third and Lincoln Highway, when new in 1908 



To mention the names of the merchants 
whose fair dealing and large stocks brought 
business to DeKalb would be impossible. They 
were the pioneers who served a trading area 
many miles in extent. Today the successors of 
these merchants are upholding the reputations 
won by hard work and good merchandise. 

One feature which brought DeKalb fame was 
the monthly Horse Sale. This w-as instituted 
in June 1887. With the large numbers of 
horses in the stables of W. L. Ellwood, who 
imported Belgian Percherons, the interest was 
high. Farmers would bring horses to sell and 
come to buy. Itinerant horse traders always 
made a point to be in DeKalb on the last Fri- 
day of each month. It was a DeKalb special. 



Farm Bureau 

Being an agricultural area it was not hard 
to interest the people in the farmer's problems. 
Therefore, when Henry Parke, of Genoa, sug- 
gested an organization to teach better farm- 
ing he found ready listeners. 

Mr. Parke was the son of a farmer who be- 
lieved and practiced better breeding and crop 
rotation. He was active in the Farmer's In- 
stitutes which were teaching these things. Early 
in 1912 he interested such men as Thomas Dil- 
lon of Genoa and S. E. Bradt of DeKalb, both 
bankers, in the idea. They, with others, form- 
ed the DeKalb County Soil Improvement As- 
sociation with headquarters in the North 
School building in DeKalb. 

On June 1, 1912 a large step forward was 
taken when they employed William G. Eck- 
hardt. of the University of Illinois, as a farm 
advisor. 



These sales continued until the demand for 
horses ceased, the last one being held about 
1919. 



DeKalb County was the first in the nation to 
take such a step. The Illinois legislature in 

(Continued on Page 46) 



Page 44 



SOMETHING TO LIVE UP TO! 



(Tv^t.-'^ 



The reputation of this bank for faithful service, through 
the many past years, has been a real responsibility. 



The people you know and the people who know you 
and who desire to serve you, hope to continue this 
faithful service through the many years to come. 



DEKALB TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK 

YOUR FRIENDLY BANK 

CORNER OF FOURTH STREET AND LINCOLN HIGHWAY 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 







Page 45 



Compliments 
of 

BRIGGS 
PRINTING 
COMPANY 



Congratulations 

H. H. EMBREE 

Giits . . . Housewares . . . Dinnerwaie . . . Glassware 
235 E. Lincoln Hwy. — Phone 6-3711 




FOR BETTER DANCING 

Top . . . Ballet . . . Toe . . . Acrobatic 

and Ballroom 

For Juniors and Teen Agers 

A School o/ Digniiy and Disfinc/ion Devofed to 
the Alt of Dance 

HELAINE SCHOOL OF DANCE 

152V2 E. Lincoln Hwy. Phone 6-3211 DeKalb, 111. 



1914 and 1917 beRan a program of help and 
the movement was underway. 

In 1922 there was celebrated in DeKalb tht 
Tenth Anniversary of the movement. This took 
the form of a parade of floats from all of the 
counties of Illinois and a pageant on the Col- 
lege campus. 

DeKalb Agricultural Association, Inc. 

This local organization has done more than 
any other to acquaint the general public of the 
United States with the name "DeKalb." De- 
Kalb's winged ear silhouette is known along 
roads in nearly every state in the union. The 
production of hybrid corn, hybrid chicks and 
hybrid sorghum has literally made DeKalb 
"The Home of the Hybrid" for the country's 
farming interests. 

This organization is an outgrowth of one of 
America'r. first farm bureaus which hired one 
of the two first farm advisers in Illinois to be- 
gin work on June 1, 1912. Early work of this 
group was to promote the purchase of lime and 
legume seed for farmers. The cash volume of 
this business soon became so great that a sep- 
arate organization was necessary to handle it. 
This organization was called the DeKalb 
County Agricultural Association, with the 
"County" later begin dropped. This organi- 
zation early became interested in seed corn im- 
provement — first with open pollinated strains 
and later with the hybrids. The first DeKalb 
Hybrid corn sales were made in 1934. Rapid 
expansion of production facilities and the sales 
foi-ce moved DeKalb to the top in seed corn 
sales in 1940 and this position has been held 
ever since. 

In 1945, work was started on a chicken 
breeding project which led to the sale of De- 
Kalb Chix, beginning about 1948. DeKalb 
pioneered in the development of the white egg. 
light weight, hybrid type bird which is now so 
popular. DeKalb operates through an Associ- 
ate Hatchery set-up involving around 300 
hatcheries in 40 states. 

The la.st of the DeKalb Hybrids in hybrid 
grain sorghum — a crop adapted primarily to 
the dry southwestern states. DeKalb's produc- 
tion at Lubbock, Texas is in the center of a 
large irrigated area in western Texas and in 
the Panhandle where sorghum production is 
highly concentrated with high yields. DeKalb 
is the first organization with any large amount 
of hybrid sorghum seed available. 

The DeKalb Agricultural Association is in- 
corporated and its stockholders and top offic- 
ials are nearly all DeKalb County men. Al- 
though selling DeKalb products now in almost 
every state in the union, the center of activities 
is at 310 North Fifth Street in DeKalb. 



Page 46 



CONGRATULATIONS 
CITY of DEKALB 

ON YOUR 

"100th ANNIVERSARY" 

N E H R I N G 

ELECTRICAL 

WORKS 

DEKALB ILLINOIS 



SHOP THE EASY WAY 

BY PHONE FROM 

SEARS 

Simply dial DeKalb 6-6311 and your shopping is done in minutes. 

NEXT DAY DELIVERY 

OVER 100,000 ITEMS TO CHOOSE FROM 

NO PARKING PROBLEMS 

NO LEAVING THE CHILDREN 

Save money and time by shopping the easy Sears catalog way by phone. 

SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO. 

DEKALB 6-6311 



Page 47 




DEKALB COUNTY FARM BUREAU BUILDING 

DeKalb County the home of the first Farm Bureau 

Organized in 1912 to promote a more profitable and 

more permanent system of agriculture in DeKalb County. 

— 3386 Members June 1, 1956 — 



I. A. A. INSURANCE SERVICE 

I.A.A. Insurance Service has been happy to serve the Farm Bureau members 
in DeKalb County by giving coverage in Country Life, and Country Mutual 
Casualty, and Country Mutual Fire Companies. 



A COMPLETE FROZEN FOOD PROCESSING SERVICE 

DEKALB COUNTY LOCKER SERVICE, INC. 



We pick up your animal for slaughter, completely processing the meat for 

your freezer or locker. 

Six conveniently located lockers and processing plants in DeKalb County. 



DEKALB Phone 6-4621 

SYCAMORE Phone 3838 

GENOA Phone 1 1 

OFFICE DeKalb 6-6361 



KIRKLAND Phone 8 

SOMONAUK Phone 2721 

WATERMAN Phone 119 

SLAUGHTER HOUSE DeKalb 6-4523 



FOR THE BEST, CALL US FIRST — 



Page 48 



IMJ 



KISHWAUKEE SERVICE COMPANY 

QUALITY PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 
AND FARM SUPPLIES 

315 North Sixth Street 

DeKalb, Illinois 
— Phone 6-6361 — 



DEKALB COUNTY GRAIN COMPANY 



IMJ 



FEEDS • FERTIUZER • SEED • STEEL PRODUCTS 

Owned and Operated by DeKalb County Farmers 
Somonauk 3211 DeKalb 6-G3G1 or G-4533 



4% FEDERAL LAND BANK LOANS 

Long Term Full Prepayment Privilege 

NATIONAL FARM LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Farm Bureau Building Phone DeKalb G-5142 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

FOX VALLEY PRODUCTION CREDIT ASS'N 

Balancing the budget is a difficult problem which every farmer is facing 
during this period of continued high operating costs and lower net income. 
If you believe you can use borrowed money to advantage at this time, 
come in and see us. 

FOX VALLEY PRODUCTION CREDIT ASS'N 

Farm Bureau Building Phone 6-G3G1 DeKalb, Illinois 



Page 49 



DeKalb Bands 

The UeKalb Band is older than the city. It 
celebrated its centennial two years ago in 1954. 

Jackson Hiland probably was the organizer 
of the DeKalb Silver Cornet Band, which wa.'; 
the first of its kind west of Chicago. 

It is also said that a small group of people 
from DeKalb followed the gold rush to the 
West and played on the stage of the then vil- 
lage of Denver, Colorado. 

During the Civil War, musicians of course 
were in service, but afterwards, when they came 
back to DeKalb, they again formed a band 
under the leadership of David McCosh and his 
brother, Daniel, and they made a real live or- 
ganization of this DeKalb band. 

After McCosh, there came unto the scene 
such band leaders as William Cheney (grand- 
father of the present bandleader. Dee Palmer) , 
Carl Qui.st, Cal Dart, B. Z. Oker, Burte Ruby 
and G. D. Weber. 

Then in 1903 there stepped into the lime- 
light, C. F. Toenniges, who was the leader of 
the band for some twenty years. 

Also in 1903 the Band accepted an invitation 
to Jjecome the Band of the Third Regiment of 
the Illinois National Guard, which post they 
held until 1917. This assignment meant a 
two-week camping period on alternating years 
at Springfield, Aurora, Elgin and Dixon. 

In 1916, when the Mexican trouble was at 
its height, the Government sent the National 
Guard of the various states into the field to 
protect the Mexican border. 

Along with these groups went the Third 
Regiment of the Illinois National Guard with 
the Band from DeKalb and Company A from 
DeKalb. The boys from DeKalb stayed on the 
border from June 1916 until February 1917, 
and they returned home February 17 to a riot- 
ous welcome from the folks they left behind. 

Back home the people still had a band. They 
were called variously "The Kids Band" or the 
Third Regiment Juniors, but whatever they 
were called they were good. 

Then because of the uncertainty of the times 
in 1917 the Third Regiment Band was shifted 
from DeKalb to Mount Morris. 

It was civic minded citizens who were al- 
ways intere.sted in the band and took over the 
financial and managerial functions which go 
along with a band. For several years, civic 
minded men worked hard to raise money for 
uniforms, in.struments, and music and to man- 
age the affairs of this worthwhile institution. 

It was in 1926 that Senator Harry G. Wright 
of DeKalb pushed through the Legislature of 

(Continued on Page 52) 




PALMER MUSIC HOUSE 

EVERYTHING MUSICAL SINCE 1890 

PIANOS — ORGANS 
BAND INSTRUMENTS 

Instruction On ALL Instruments 

MAGNAVOX and RCA HI-FI PHONOGRAPHS 
FENDER GUITARS 

Three generations of musical experience has gone 

into the selection of our fine lines 

of musical merchandise. 



DEE PALMER 

229 E. Lincoln Hwy. 



C. H. PALMER 
Phone 6-3952 



WIRTZ and WIRTZ 

DeKalb County Home Furnishers 

"YESTERDAY — TODAY — TOMORROW" 

A store, like a city, should expect to grow older ■ 
and plan to keep young. 



C. B. R. 

COMMON CARRIER SERVICE TO ALL POINTS 

SERVING DEKALB AND 
SYCAMORE DAILY 

PHONE ENTERPRISE 7700 



Page 50 




Lehan Drugs 

WALGREEN AGENCY 
Cor. Third & Lincoln Hwy. 



For the Best in Food — 
Eat at Lehans Fountain" 



Your Health and 
Beauty Center" 




Page 51 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to 

CITY OF DEKALB 

NEWQUIST FOUNDRY COMPANY 

H. P. NEWQUIST, President 

GRAY IRON CASTINGS 

1115 Eiast Locust Street 

DE KALB, ILLINOIS 



Illinois a bill permitting cities to levy a 2-mill 
tax for band support. The ink was hardly dry 
on the Governor's signature before DeKalb 
went to work. The result was that in 1926 
DeKalb became the first city to have a munici- 
pal band supported by a municipal tax. 

After becoming a municipal organization, 
the DeKalb band really went places. They 
went to the Chicago Music Land Festival three 
years in a row and have taken high honors 
everywhere that they have gone. 

The present organization, known as the De- 
Kalb Municipal Band, has attracted attention 
from all over the State of Illinois with its sacred 
concerts, its Music Festivals, and its wonderful 
and accurate playing. 



Public Library 



One of the boasts of the city of DeKalb is its 
fine public library, which came into being on 
July 1, 1893, by an ordinance of the City Coun- 
cil. Mrs. E. B. McMurray was the first librar- 
ian. 

At first the library was located on the sec- 
ond floor of the City Hall. Later it was moved 



to the second floor of the Chronicle Building 
and remained there until February 15. 1931. 
when it moved into a handsome new building, 
the gift of Mr. Jacob Haish. 

During the depression years it was hard to 
find money with which to purchase new books, 
and a civic committee was formed to ask for 
donations of books or funds. Since that time 
there have been several bequests and donations, 
which have enabled the library to keep pace 
with the latest and best books. Chief among 
the bequests is the Verna Newsham Memorial 
Fund for the purchase of non-fiction books. In 
recent years the practice of giving books as 
memorials has grown, and many public spirited 
citizens now present to the library current 
books which they have read and wish others to 
have the chance to read. 



An auxiliary organization known as Friends 
of the Library has aided in making the library 
a cultural center of DeKalb through the pre- 
sentation of talks, art displays, and exhibits of 
current interest. In addition, the Library 
Whist Club, an organization of interested wo- 
men, has for some sixty years lent its support 
to the library. 



Page 52 



Theaters 

The churches and schools were probably the 
first places people of DeKalb went to for en- 
tertainment. The theater received an early 
boost by the first editor of the DeKalb Chron- 
icle, Clinton Rosette. 

Editor Rosette was the booster for a Dollar 
Lecture Course which included lectures, plays 
and music in its repertoire. After the Chron- 
icle building was completed these entertain- 
ments were held there. In fact, for a long time 
the second floor of this building was the focal 
point for the culture of the town. 

When Jacob Haish built his building on the 
northwest corner of Third and Lincoln High- 
way in 1876 the second floor was a theater 
and the building was called the "Opera House 
Block." This building burned in 1906, but was 
speedily rebuilt and included a theater con- 
structed on the north end of the building and 
called the "Haish Auditorium." 

In this theater played all manner of road 
shows and stock companies and many a famous 
actor appeared here. As in all theaters of this 
t.ype there was a "peanut gallery" and the oc- 



cupants cheered the hero and hissed the vil- 
lain with great fervor. In the late 1930's the 
structure was torn down to make way for the 
present Drs. Smith Building. 

The Bijou, Star, and Princess Theaters came 
along showing motion pictures and vaudeville. 
The Bijou, for vaudeville only, was located in 
a building just west of the First National Bank 
which was incorporated into the bank building 
in one of the remodelings of that structure. 
The date given for the start of the Bijou is 
1906. 

The Star came into being in 1907 as a mo- 
tion picture theater, and it was located next to 
the DeKalb Trust and Savings Bank and fin- 
ally was absorbed in the remodeling of that 
building. 

The Princess Theater, started in 1913, was 
located in the building now occupied by Sohn's 
Clothing Store, and it will be remembered for 
the great pictures shown there. Mr. Glenn W. 
Reynolds was the owner and manager and Mrs. 
Reynolds played the piano accompaniments for 
the pictures. 

The Armory Theater on Locust Street, now 
the Masonic Temple, was built in as an Armory 



Best Wishes 

to DEKALB on your 
* CENTENNIAL * 



HIGHWAY MOTOR SERVICE 



222 18th AVENUE 
ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 



ROCKFORD 5-0521 
DE KALB 6-3232 



Page 53 



for the Company A of the Illinois National 
Guard, but it also provided space for vaude- 
ville, home talent plays, expositions and other 
events. In the basement was a roller skating 
rink and dance floor. 

DeKalb's theaters became modern when the 
DeKalb Theater was built in 1923 on Lincoln 
Highway, in the Montgomery Ward Store 
building. This was an up-to-date motion pic- 
ture house, with a large pipe organ, but the 
coming of sound pictures made a change neces- 
sarv and the company built the Egyptian in 
1929. 

The same year, 1929, the Fargo Theater was 
built, but for a time during that year DeKalb 
theatergoers had to go elsewhere w'hile these 
two theaters were under construction. 

In 1949 the new DeKalb, the late.st in thea- 
ters, was opened on North Third Street. 

Then the DeVal Drive-In-Theater on Syca- 
more Road came in 1948. 



The Stage Coach Players 

The Stage Coach Players is a non-profit or- 
ganization with membership open to all De- 



Kalb County people who wish to share in the 
responsibilities and pleasures of producing 
amateur plays and in the encouragement of 
theater arts in the community. 

Organized in 1947 under the leadership of 
Ann Smith Gray, the group had several suc- 
cessful seasons in its temporary home, a barn 
lent by John Ellwood. Mrs. E. P. Ellwood's 
stage coach, which was used as a box office, 
was the source of the name of the group. 

When it became necessary to find a perman- 
ent building, a group of interested citizens 
formed the Stage Coach Theater Corporation. 
Through the sale of non-interest bearing stock 
enough money was acquired to purchase land 
and begin building the present theater, located 
opposite the County Home halfway between 
Sycamore and DeKalb on Route 23. From the 
proceeds of the plays and by means of volun- 
teer labor, the building was completed for the 
19.53 summer season. 

Productions of the Stage Coach Players have 
become widely known not only for the fine 
quality of amateur acting but for the effective 
staging, sets, and costumes. Rotation of di- 
rectors and new combinations of talent in all 
phases of play production for each play 

(Continued on Page 57) 



FIVE community PARKS 

. . . help make DeKalb beautiful 



HOPKINS PARK .... large and spacious — scene of great activity 
ANNIES WOODS .... quiet, secluded and private 
DEKALB RECREATION FIELD .... baseball's haven 
HUNTLEY PARK .... your neighborhood park 
SHIPMAN PARK .... children's playground 

Continuous 4-Season Recreational Activity 

DeKalb has a park for almost every need — Barbecue Pits, Open-Air Stoves, 
Picnic Benches and Tables — Baseball Diamonds, Playground Equipment — 
Scenic Walk-v/crys. 

Hopkins Park offers a band shell and seating capacity for 1,200; a large 
shelter house; one of Northern Illinois' finest swimming pools with a modern 
bath house, and a record attendance of over 53,000 admittances last summer. 

DEKALB PARK DISTRICT 



ESTABUSHED IN 1935 



. . . THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 
Robert Hunt, Presidenf 
George Black, Vice-President 
Kenneth Culver 
Mrs. W. W. Wirtz 
Robert Ball 



. . . ASSOCIATED WITH BOARD 
DeWitt Osgood, Secretary 
R. F. McCormick, Treasurer 
Byron Kaiser, Custodian 
John G. Boyle, Lega7 Advisor 
Jerry Farmer, Pool Manager 
George Dertinger, Athletic Director 



The board of commissioners cae elected by public ballot 
and serve for six-year terms. 



Page 54 



2)JOi - JiL 



LHOLA 

Have you ever been fortunate enouRh to ride a ferry boat out to the Statue of Liberty, stand 
amonj? a g:roup of tourists from foreign countries, have them look at the wonderful New York 
Skyline, look up at the Statue of Liberty, and turn and ask you — "Do these Americans realize 
what a wonderful country they have?". If you have ever had that experience, then you know the 
thrill that comes up from the deepest part of your body when you answer, "I am an American!". 
Have you ever stood atop of Mount Wilson in California, looked up at the first seven television sta- 
tions built in North America and looked out over the city of Los Angeles spread before you and 
heard the same question from a group of engineers from all over the world when they say, "What 
a Country! Do these people realize how great it really is?". Then the great feeling comes 
again when you say, "I am an American!". Have you ever had the pleasure of riding in an obser- 
vation car on one of our great western i-ailroads and sat among a group of people from other 
countries travelling across our Country — when they pass over the Mississippi River and the great 
prairie state of Illinois and the wonderful miles of waving corn, the great fields of golden grain 
and green alfalfa, then have one of them turn to you and say, "My, what a Country!". Again 
comes the great feeling when you are able to say, "I am an American!". 

I recently was on such a train and when it pulled into the terminal in Chicago, there was a great 
hustle and bustle among all of us to get off, but as we alighted on the train platform, a group of 
college boys were returning to their university at Urbana and suddenly we were all struck silent 
as they started to sing — 

"Not without thy wonderous story 
Can be told thy nation's glory, 
Illinois, my Illinois." 

Then indeed did I have a feeling that is hard to de.scribe when I could turn to this group of 
newly met friends and say, "I was born in Illinois". The discussion then turned to what made 
Illinois such a great state and one of which we were so proud. This led up to the fact that it con- 
sisted of thousands of wonderful little towns from which have come the leaders of practically 
every line of endeavor and the most natural thing, of course, was to say that I came from De- 
Kalb, Illinois — the birthplace of barbed wire that led to the great development of the west, 
and that from this great little city, just hundreds throughout the state, had come great leaders in 
educaion. great steel men, men who had developed great copper manufacturing plants, pianos, 
reaper.-^, hybrid seed corn, and that today there were still living in DeKalb many descendents of 
the men who played such a great part in making our city great — that we are proud of it, and 
rightfully so; and now it is coming to the great period of its existence — Its One Hundredth An- 
niversary ! 

To tell that story and tell it right and tell it in a manner in which we will be rightfully proud 
is going to take the cooperation and backing of every man, woman and child in our community 
and each of us should do the part that we are capable of doing. You will be given an opportunity 
to play a part in letting everybody know what you think of the town that you call home. 

Respectfully submitted, 




T. E. Courtney, President 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS CORPORATION 



Page 55 



AUTOMOTIVE TRANSPORTATION 

The roll of the automobile dealer is of ever increasing importance in DeKalb. Dealers 
through their products and services stand ready to serve the transportation needs of the 
community. In an industry whose yearly progress is so easily measured by new models 
and performance standards, the automobile dealer meets a daily challenge to progress. 

DeKalb dealers today offer their customers the latest in automotive products and serv- 
ice techniques. The challenge of the past has been met as is evidenced by the modern 
facilities available to the motorist in DeKalb. DeKalb dealers look forward with confi- 
dence and pride m their ability to serve the needs of automotive transportation in the 
future. 




MEMBERS 



BALLAS FORD SALES 

BREEZY'S GARAGE 

CLARK MOTOR SALES 

DE KALB MOTOR SALES 

DEKALB BUICK GARAGE 

FORREST ANDREWS CO. 

FOURTH STREET MOTOR SALES, INC. 



FREITAG PONTIAC 
GIBSON MOTOR SALES 
MILBURN MOTOR SALES 
RUSSELL G. SMITH GARAGE 
SAWYER SERVICE STATION 
TOBY'S AUTO SALES 



DEKALB AUTOMOTIVE TRADE ASSOCIATION 



Page 56 



achieve a distinctive variety and freshness. 

In addition to giving adult plays each sum- 
mer, the Stage Coach Players have an active 
interest in other types of theatrical produc- 
tion. Whenever suitable personnel is available, 
plays for children are produced. Another de- 
parture from the usual type of summer theater 
has been the production of two Gilbert and 
Sullivan operettas in order to provide vehicles 
for DeKalb County's .singers and in.strumental- 
ists. Another effort of the Players has been 
to support and encourage dramatics in the 
schools. Proceeds from one musical produc- 
tion were given to purchase and install lighting 
equipment for the stage of the DeKalb Junior 
High School. The Players have also sponsored 
performances of the DeKalb High School con- 
test plays so that the public could .share in the 
enjoyment of these student productions. 

The value of the Stage Coach Theater to 
DeKalb County lies not only in the presenta- 
tion of live theater to audiences but in the rich 
experience of a cross section of DeKalb young 
people and adults working together. All ages, 
all occupations, all varieties of people can share 
in this artistic, educational, and recreational 



WIRTZ FUNERAL HOME 

Wirtz — Claxton — Roche 

"OUR HOME IS YOUR HOME" 

Pine and Fifth 
Dial 6-6741 



group. There is no talent so slight that it can- 
not be used in some of the aspects of theater 
work. 

The Tenth Anniversary Season of the Stage 
Coach Players, in keeping with the centennial 
theme of DeKalb, will open with an old time 
Melodrama, DIRTY WORK AT THE CROSS- 
ROADS, directed by Victor Griffin. It will run 
June 21 to June 24. Following it at two-week 
intervals will be SABRINA FAIR directed by 
Paul Crawford, THE SHOP AT SLY CORNER, 
directed by Dale Jeffryes, and DIAL M FOR 
MURDER, directed by Rex Murray. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

CITY OF DEKALB 



135 N. Monroe 
Genoa, IlL 
Ph. 302 




HALVERSON BROS. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Residence and Commercial; Remodeling and Repairing 

FREE ESTIMATES 



1327 N. 14th 

DeKalb. 111. 

Ph. e-6433 



Page 57 




Lincoln Highway looking West from Seventh Street about 1912 



Financial Institutions 

Only three years after the village of DeKalb 
came into being a bank was established. In 
1859 E. T. Hunt and John Hamilton formed a 
banking Company. Although the exact title 
of this bank is not known, it is certain that it 
was located on the area that is now 236 East 
Lincoln Highway. 

Later Dr. Rufus Hopkins purchased Mr. 
Hamilton's interest and E. P. Young purchased 
Mr. Hunt's, and the company was known as 
Rufus Hopkins and Company. Somewhere in 
the succession this company was known as 
Hopkins, Hunt and Company, for there is a 
check in e.xistence bearing that name. 

After a series of changes in ownership, the 
DeKalb National Bank was fcirmed in 1882 
with H. P. Taylor as president, Jacob Haish, 
vice president and T. A. Luney, cashier. In 
1902 it became the First National Bank of De- 
Kalb, and in 1934 the name was changed to 
First National Bank in DeKalb. 

Jacob Haish organized his private bank, the 
Barb Citv Bank, in 1884, located on the south- 



west corner of Third and Lincoln until 1907 
when it was moved to the northwest corner of 
that intersection. In 1910 it was chartered by 
the state as the Jacob Haish State Bank. This 
bank was in existence until 1922 when it was 
purchased by the First National Bank. 

Another banking institution was organized 
in 1902 as the Commercial Trust and Savings 
Bank, and it built the building which is now 
known as the Commercial Trades Building. In 
1912 this company was purchased by the stock- 
holders of the First National and moved to 
their building and renamed the First Trust and 
Savings Bank. It was liquidated in 1933. 

The bank which has the distinction of being 
the oldest chartered bank without change of 
name in town is the DeKalb Trust and Savings 
Bank. Opening for business on November 3. 
1909, it has been in the same location for all 
47 years. 

It was located in the building at 363 East 
Lincoln Highway known as the "Ronan Build- 
ing." In 1923 the bank purchased the build- 



Page 58 



ing, remodeled it, and since then has expanded 
its quarters several times. In the same year 
the bank was given trust powers by the auditor 
of the public accounts. 

;\Ir. ;\I. Hanrahan was elected a director in 
1909 and served 43 years until his death in 
1953. 

On December 28. 1923, the Northern Illinois 
Corporation was formed with H. G. Wright, 
president; H. H. Cornforth, Vice President, and 
T. E. Courtney, Secretary-Treasurer. The cap- 
ital was $30,000, and it was increased to $100.- 
000 in 1924, and the name was changed to 
Northern Illinois Corporation in 1929. A fur- 
ther change in name was made in 1942 when 
the present one was adopted. The company 
received its first small loan license in 1931. In 
1939 the Northern Illinois Insurance Agency 
was organized, and in 1955 the Northern Ill- 
inois Credit Life Insurance Company was put 
into service as a subsidiary. Later the Friendly 
Finance Corporation, operating in Wisconsin 
was purchased. During World War II a man- 
ufacturing division was set up to make treads 
for tanks. 

It was W. H. Bu.sh. son-in-law of J. F. Glid- 
den, who pushed the plan for a Building and 
Loan Association. This was in May 1885, and 
the group around him immediately applied for 



a license and on June 9, 1885, the first officers 
of the association were elected and the bylaws 
adopted. 

Since then there has been a steady growth 
from 19 share holders to 2967 as of today. 
Seven men, beginning with P. G. Young in 1885 
and extending to A. W. Jackson in 1956, have 
served as president. Mr. C. E. Bradt served 
as secretary from 1885 to 1933. The service 
of all these men have given the Association a 
stability that is well earned. 

Future plans call for the erection of a build- 
ing of its own on the corner of Third and Lo- 
cu.st Streets. 



DeKalb Hospitals 

The first DeKalb Hospital was founded in 
May 1906. by Dr. Herbert B. Nevins. Original- 
ly Dr. and Mrs. Nevins operated the institution 
as a cancer hospital, but the demand grew for 
a more general type of institution. 

In 1909, Dr. Frederick Millar of Sycamore, a 
Universali.st minister, took over the manage- 
ment and e.stablished it as a hospital and home 
for the aged, calling it the DeKalb Private Hos- 
pital and Old Peoples' Home. 

Joseph F. Glidden, one of the leading fig- 



WE GIVE 
TOP J ALUE STAMPS 



LIVE BETTER 
EOR LESS 




We are proud to be a growing part of the City of DeKalb. 
Our large new super market is a symbol of the confidence 
we have that DeKalb will progress in the years to come 
as it has the past century. 



Page 59 




DeKalb Public Hospital. South First Street, 1910 

ures in DeKalb history, died in 1906 and left 
$20,000 to build the Glidden Memorial Hos- 
pital. This amount was insufficient to con- 
struct a building of the size needed, and no pro- 
vision was made for maintaining the institution. 

September 11, 1912, the private hospital and 
old folks' home was deeded to A. G, Kennedy, 
who mortgaged the property to pay its indebt- 
edness, and then presented the property with 
the mortgage to the city. 

In 1913. Mrs. Clinton Rosette left an estate 
valued at $50,000 as an endowment for a city 
hospital, and in 1916 at a special election, the 
citizens voted a $35,000 bond issue to be used 
with the Glidden fund to build a hospital. 

In order to use the Rosette endowment fund, 
it was proposed to build the Glidden Memorial 
Hospital and lease it to the city to be used as 
the public hospital. Through the aid of addi- 
tional bond issues and bequests from I. L. Ell- 
wood's estate, the hospital was built and open- 
ed in October, 1922. It contained 40 beds and 
nine bassinettes. 

In October, 1914, the Hospital Benefit Club 
had been organized to give volunteer aid to 
the hospital. The group sewed for the hospital, 
making all the sheets, pillow cases, surgical 
gowns, linens, and layettes used. When the 
new hospital was built, it and other civic or- 
ganizations, private individuals, druggists and 
doctors helped to equip it. 

In 1952, vast improvements were completed. 
The porches at the north and south were en- 
closed to become rooms. New X-ray equip- 
ment was installed and the laboratory was mov- 
ed from the basement to the fourth floor. The 
kitchen was given a new floor, stoves, and 
steam tables, and the diet kitchens on each 
floor have added facilities. 

The day before the opening of the Glidden 
Memorial Hospital, another magnificent insti- 



tution, St. Mary's Hospital, was opened in De- 
Kalb. This hospital has 45 beds and eight bas- 
sinettes and is fully equipped and modern in all 
details. DeKalb is indebted to Rev. J. A. Solon 
and the parish of St. Mary's Catholic Church 
for this institution. 

The only other hospital located in DeKalb 
was the O. M. Blood institution on North First 
Street, which started in 1907 and ended its 
career in 1909, 



Newspapers 

The newspapers of DeKalb appeared early 
The first was the Western World and DeKalb 
Review in 1858 with Samual Adams as editor. 
Two years later the DeKalb Leader was estab- 
lished with Eli B. Gilbert, as editor. 

The DeKalb Times suceeded the Leader in 
the early sixties. G. D. R. Boyd was the editor 
and he edited newspapers in DeKalb and 
Sycamore for several years. In 1867 A. K 
Stiles founded the DeKalb County News for the 
express purpose of defeating the "Half Shire" 
bill which was hot political news at the time. 
Editor Stiles was suceeded by Lucien Post who 
held the position until the paper was taken 
over by the Chronicle in 1884. 

The present DeKalb Daily Chronicle was es- 
tablished on March 8, 1879 with Clinton Ros- 
ette the editor and J. F. Glidden the publisher. 
This too was a political venture as it was the 
purpose to sponsor the cause of the Democratic 
Party. This is seen in the slogan which was 
carried in every issue "Democratic in all things 
and under all circumstances." 

It was a weekly paper for some time becom- 
ing daily in the 1890's as it was daily on Jan- 
uary 1, 1897. On September 3, 1907 the name 
was changed to The DeKalb Evening Chronicle 
and remained such until January 15, 1909. 

On this date Mr. E. J. Raymond and Frank 
Greenaway purchased the paper from the J. 
F. Glidden Publishing Company and it has re- 
mained in those families ever since. 

Due to the activities of W. L. Ellwood in the 
field of horse breeding the Chronicle publish- 
ed a breeder's magazine called the American 
Breeder starting January 1887 and soon copies 
were being sent to all parts of the world. 

The Chronicle had competition as there was 
early established a rival called the DeKalb Re- 
view. This was in 1888 and E. A. Grey was 
the editor. The rivalry between the two was 
very strong and the two never let an opportun- 
ity pass to revile the other. 

About 1887 Herbert Fay and D. W. Tyrrell 
took over the editorship and publishing of the 

I Continued on Page 63) 



Page 60 



The 

IMPERIAL 

SHOWS 

Will be on the 

MIDWAY 



Entertainment at 
its BEST! 



THRILLS! FUNl and 
GAYETY FOR ALL! 



Shows • Concessions • Rides 



Page 61 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to 
BUSINESS ... EDUCATION 

INDUSTRY 
AND TO THE PEOPLE OF 

DE K ALB 

ON YOUR 100th ANNIVERSARY 



SHOAF ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

DDCON, ILLINOIS 



Page 62 




Sycamore Road looking North from Ninth Street - 1908 



Review with Mr. Fay becoming the sole owner 
later. The paper was a weekly and had two 
editions, one for DeKalb and the other for 
Malta. The latter was called the "Malta 
Mail." ThL'; suspended publication when Mr. 
Fay left for Springfield, Illinois to become cus- 
todian of the Lincoln Tomb. 

The DeKalb Advertiser was published by 
Bailey Rosette a Brother of Clinton Rosette, edi- 
tor of the Chronicle. This too was a weekly 
and was started March 4, 1989 and continued 
until May 1, 1914 when it was absorbed by the 
Chronicle. 

The DeKalb Daily Independent was es- 
tablished February 15, 1915 by Robert New- 
comber and L. G. Tyrrell and continued until 
July 1935 when it too was taken over by the 
Chronicle. 



Churches 

The first church to be organized in the new 
settlement was the Baptist. On October 15, 
1844, a group formed the Union Grove Baptist 
Church. This organization met in a school- 
house located near the present County Home. 

With the influx of settlers came several of 



this denomination and they built a frame 
church on the present site in 1855, the labor for 
which was dedicated by the members. At the 
same time the name was changed to the First 
Baptist Church of DeKalb. 

In 1885 this frame building was replaced by 
a brick edifice which was enlarged and remod- 
eled in 1902 and 1920. At the latter time a 
pipe organ, the gift of Jacob Haish, was in- 
stalled. 

The Methodists and the Congregationalists 
were the next to begin. In 1854 the people of 
the Methodist faith began to meet at the home 
of Basil Ruby with Circuit Rider William 
Browne as a spiritual leader. On June 28, 1855, 
the first trustees were elected. 

As the congregation grew they began to 
meet in the school house on the corner of Sec- 
ond and Grove Streets. After meeting there 
for a year or two they built a church on the 
northeast corner of Fourth and Grove. In this 
building the Sunday School was organized, the 
women became active and music was introduc- 
ed into the services. 

By 1879 the building had become too small 
and a new one was erected on the southeast 

(Continued on Page 65' 



Page 63 



DE KALB-OGLE 
TELEPHONE COMPANY 



Page 64 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CITY OF DEKALB 

BEAUTY SALON OWNERS 



ALEXIS BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 
•ALICE'S BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 
*ANNE'S BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 

CHAMBERLAINS BEAUTY NOOK, DeKalb 

CLOVERS BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 
•CARLSON'S BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 
*DANNAS BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 
•EDNA'S BEAUTY NOOK, DeKalb 
•EUGENE BEAUTY MART, DeKalb 

BOYNTONS, Sycamore 

EXQUISITE BEAUTY SHOPPE, DeKalb 

'Member of DeKalb Unit 18 of N.H.C.A. 



•FARGO BEAUTY NOOK, Sycamore 
•KAY'S BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 
•LADY ANNE BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 

LUCILLE'S BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 
•LUNDBLADS BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 
•MORRIS BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 
•PETERSON BEAUTY SHOP, Waterman 

PHYL-LOUISE BEAUTY SHOP, Sycamore 

SILVER PRINCESS BEAUTY SHOP, DeKalb 

SWIRL SHOPPE, DeKalb 
•WANDA LEE BEAUTY SHOP, Lee 



corner of Fourth and Locust Streets. This build- 
ing was dedicated March 8, 1880, free from 
debt. However, an expanding congregation in 
an expanding town caused the members to feel 
the need for a larger building and on Septem- 
ber 29, 1909, the present church was dedicated. 

Need for more room has made another build- 
ing project necessary and plans are underway 
for an educational building located to the north 
of the church. At the same time a building on 
Normal Road has been purchased as a Wesley 
Foundation center for work among the college 
students. 

The Congregationali.sts organized on Decem- 
ber 2, 1854, in the school on Second Street with 
eight charter members. They soon purchased 
this school house for $600.00 and used it as a 
church for 34 years. The stone church build- 
ing on this lot was built in 1888 and a parson- 
age was built to the south of the church in 
1892. 

With them too, expansion was necessary and 
plans were started for a new church to care 
for the needs of the people. Also, the location 
next to the railroad was not the best. On July 



4, 1954, a new church building was dedicated 
on Noi-th First Street. Included in this plan 
was that nece.ssary adjunct to modern living 
— a large parking lot. 

The members of this church have been ex- 
tremely generous in their support of the pro- 
gram. The stone church was made possible by 
the generosity of I. L. Ellwood and J. F. Glid- 
den and the late.st by the J. A. Spickerman 
family. Although these people were generous 
the congregation as a whole helped to the best 
of their ability. 

When the Swedish people came to this area 
in 1850 they had to look elsewhere for spirit- 
ual leadership. However, on Christmas Day 
1858. they organized what is now the First 
Lutheran Church. For a time they were affili- 
ated with the church in Geneva, but in Octob- 
er 1, 1865, they dedicated their own church 
building. 

This was located on the corner of Sixth and 
Pine Streets and served these people until 1889 
when a large brick building was built on the 
same site. This building was also replaced 
when on June 4, 1916, the present church was 
dedicated. 



Page 65 



A parsonage was built in 1923 adjacent to 
the church and in 1955 they purchased the 
Jacob Haish home for use in an expanding pro- 
gram. 

The people of the Catholic faith worshipped 
in a grove of trees as early as 1850 with Rev. 
Muller as the leader. The first resident priest 
was Rev. John Murray who was appointed in 
1861 to organize the parish and build the first 
church. 

This church was a frame building on the 
corner of Fourth and Pine Streets, the present 
location. In 1894, under the leadership of 
Father O'Connor the work of erecting the pre- 
sent structure was started. 

The frame building was moved to the back 
of the lot and the present building was built in 
its place. On October 9, 1901 the building was 
dedicated by Father J. A. Solon, who served 
the church for many years. 

More recently a fine sisters home has been 
erected across from the church. 

In April 1876, Rev. William Toll established 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church on South Second 
Street. A frame building was erected in 1877, 
later to be moved to the rear of the lot, and a 
new brick church built in 1917. The old build- 
ing is used as a guild hall. In 1953 a student 
center was established at 328 Augusta Avenue 
to serve the Students at Northern. This was 



the first of such centers to be established. 

Space limitations prevent a detailed descrip- 
tion of the other fine churches in DeKalb. The 
following sketches will give the highlights of 
their history. 

The Advents organized in 1861 and met in 
the building east of the South School. After 
being inactive for some years this building was 
moved to Seventh and State Streets in 1898 
where the congregation worships today. 

Fifteen charter members formed the Swed- 
ish Evangelical Mi.ssion Church in 1882. Their 
building was located on the corner of Seventh 
and Prospect Streets. At one time they divid- 
ed; one segment, known as the Swedish Con- 
gregational Church, remaining in the old build- 
ing, the other erected a new building on 
Seventh and Fisk Avenues. Later they reunit- 
ed under the name of the Mission Covenant 
Church at the latter address. 

The Finnish people of DeKalb early banded 
together for worship. In 1895 they began to 
meet in the Finnish Temperance Hall and later 
built a church of their own at State and Market 
Streets. In 1955 on the 60th Anniversary of 
the Bethlehem Lutheran Church they voted to 
build a new church to care for the growing 
needs of the congregation. 

In 1898 two church groups were founded, 

(Continued on Page 68) 



Congratulations 
JOSEPH BRODY & BROS.. INC 



Page 66 




SAMUEL E BRADT 

Managing Officer 

1885 - 1936 



A VISION 
THAT BECAME A REALITY 

FAITH IN DEKALB 

Led to the Founding of This Association Back in 1885 




ALTHEA R. DAVY 



Faith in DeKalb and a desire to help themselves, their friends and neighbors become Home Owners and save 
money led to the founding of this Association. 

On Saturday. May 23, 1885 nineteen local citizens met in the sample room of the Clidden House, now Hotel 
DeKalb, for the purpose of discussing the organization of a building and loan association for DeKalb. Those 
men, who laid firm foundations, were — W. H. Bush, D. D. Brown, A. W. Sprague, C. C. Bodman, P. 
C. Young. Wm. E. Holliday, O. Carter, E. C. Lott. W. L. Pond. J. D. Lott, A. W. Fisk, S. A. Tyler Sr., E. 0. 
Wood, M. A. L. Olsen. S. E. Bradt. J. A. McDole, James Leishman, John Reed and T. A. Luney. At that meeting 
the application for license was signed and application was made to the Secretary of State for a charter. 

Over the years since that date a successful and uninterrupted service has contributed increasingly to the 
prosperous development of the area. Today hundreds own their homes Debt Free and hundreds of others are 
presently being helped toward their goal of a Debt Free Home. 

The same combination of sound policies and progressive practices, laid down by the organizers, guides the 
association today. The present management pledges a continuation of those firm foundations to assure further 
assistance in the years to come. 



THE PRESENT MANAGEMENT 



OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES 



Athea R. Davy 



Ray C. Frautschy 



A lacobson 

W. lackson 

T S. Wilton 

I Stonesifcr 



Chairman of the Bo 

President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Attorney 

Teller-Bookkeepers 





-C H Iskowich 
-A W. Jackson 
-j. A. Jacobson 
-Ray C. Frautschy 
-Althea R. Davy 
-Harris D. Fisk 
-Bcrniece M. Twombly 

Martha H. Hakala 

Lyie L. Schule 




RAY C. FRAUTSCHY 
Secretary 



DEKALB BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

DEKALB ILLINOIS 

(SINCE 1885) 



A GOOD PLACE TO SAVE 



A GOOD PLACE TO BORROW 

Page 67 



r It 





\^/*mlXia/€i/ti? 



THE GREATEST NAME IN 
WATER CONDITIONING 



1234 E. Lincoln Highway 
DE KALB, ILLINOIS 



WATER SOFTENER: SALES, RENTALS OR SERVICE — RUST 




PROTECTION 

TASTE b ODOR REMOVAL 



the Salvation Army and the Immanual Luth- 
eran Church. The Salvation Army held num- 
erous open air meetings and had quarters in 
various buildings until they secured their own 
building a short time ago. 

The Immanuel Lutheran Church after a per- 
iod of trials became firmly established in 1926 
when they dedicated their building on Fifth 
and Fisk Streets. Their pastor, Rev. Paul 
Schauer, has served them for 23 years. 

Through the efforts of Dr. Charles Carter 
the Cortland Chapel of the Reorganized 
Church of Latter Day Saints was moved to De- 
Kalb in 1905. In 1915 they purchased the 
building they now occupy at Seventh and Pros- 
pect Streets and have an active congregation. 
Russell Huntley, founder of DeKalb. was bap- 
tised by Elder Mark Forschutt of this faith in 
1863. Dr. Carter and John L. Cooper, a De- 
Kalb merchant, served this church for several 
years. 

The year 1907 saw the establishment of the 
Christian Science Church in the home of Mr. 
Buckland. Later, in 1909, the present sanctuary 
was built on the same site. 



After using various halls and buildings for a 
meeting place the Trinity Lutheran Church 
people built their own church in 1941. The 
inception of this church was in 1917 when Rev. 
C. A. Paulson came to town every third Sun- 
day for Services. The formal organization 
came in 1919 and the congregation has grown 
until it ranks with the leaders in the town. 

Of the smaller and newer churches we have 
in DeKalb the Four Square Church on South 
First Street; the Grove Street Baptist Church 
at Ninth and Grove and the Church of God on 
Lewis Street. Other groups holding religious 
services are: Church of the Nazorene, the 
Church of Christ, and the Jehovah's Witnesses. 

The last church to be organized is the Bap- 
tist Chapel, a branch of the Southern Baptist 
Church now meeting in the Masonic Temple, 
but looking for a building location. This or- 
ganization took place April 21, 1956. 

Thus the first and the last churches to be es- 
tablished in DeKalb are of the Baptist denom- 
ination. 



Page 68 



EVERY DAY AT NOON . . . 



New Super 7 Service 




Each day at noon a Pan American 
Super 7 Clipper leaves Chicago di- 
rect to Europe. You can choose 
either tourist-fare "Rainbow" or 
f'rst-class "President". Either way, 
you fly without changing planes. 



Fly Pan Am to London, and on to Paris. 
Rome and all Europe! On Pan Am's 
"See-more" routes, you can, for example, 
visit as many as 17 cities in Europe and 
pay only the round-trip fare to Rome. 

Choose first-class President service for 
Sleeperette* service easy chairs that let 
you sleep lying down; foam-soft berths 
(extra); meals by Maxim's of Paris with 
complimentary cocktails and wines. 

Or choose thrifty Rainbow Clipper* 
tourist service, with the same experienced 
crews as on first class, plus free meals 
aloft, reclining restful seats, bar service. 

Either way, you fly to Europe as most 
people do— on the world's most 
experienced airline. Over 50,000 
Atlantic crossings. 

Ticket office: 300 North Michigan Ave. 
Phone DEarborn 2-4900 Chicago 1, III. 




LONDON 




SCANDINAVIA 



?..S..P.LD.'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE 



Page 69 



Post Office Is Established 

The establishment of the Post Office in De- 
Kalb community came shortly after the settle- 
ment of DeKalb became more or less perman- 
ent. It was February 8, 1849 that the Post 
Office of DeKalb Center was established with 
Russell Huntley as the first postmaster. The 
Post Office itself was located in Russell Hunt- 
ley's Eaple Hotel. The name continued to be 
DeKalb Center until May 24, 1883 when it be- 
came simply DeKalb. For the record, Aaron 
S. Jackson was the first Postmaster in the new 
office of DeKalb. Since Russell Huntley, and 
including Huntley, there have been twenty-two 
postmasters of DeKalb Center or DeKalb. two 
of whom have been women. 



Some Firsts 

The first store to be established on what is 
now the site of DeKalb was established by John 
Goodell. and this was located on the site of 
what is now The Chronicle Building. Prob- 
ably the first house, or dwelling place, to be 
established in DeKalb was that of Basil Ruby 
which was located on what is now South First 
Street about where Montgomery Ward's Farm 
Store is at the present day. 



In 1853, DeKalb had a store, blacksmith 
shop, a few residences and the Eagle Hotel, 
and there were twenty-nine people in the town. 

It was the coming of the railroad which gave 
DeKalb the boom which was needed for it to 
grow. It was the coming of the railroad which 
influenced Russell Huntley to have the town 
surveyed, the streets laid out and the lots and 
the blocks marked off. This was done in 1853, 
the plot being filed with the Recorder of Deeds 
in Sycamore December 17, 1873. 

It was August 12, 1873 that this much talk- 
ed of railroad finally reached DeKalb and was 
ready for service. One can imagine the feel- 
ings of the store-keepers and the farmers when 
the little engine with probably one or two cars 
came to a puffing stop at the new station which 
was located on Third Street back of what is 
now the J. C. Penny Company store on Lincoln 
Highway today. It was this railroad which 
provided the easy means of transportation to 
Chicago that provided DeKalb with the impet- 
uous that was needed for it to grow. That the 
coming of the railroad was a boon to the town 
is shown in the population figures which show 
that in 1855 the settlement had a population 
of 577 people while in 1860 the figure had 
grown to 1,900. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

ED'S TAVERN 

411 North Tenth Street 
DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



ED ROHLIK 



BILL SULLIVAN 



Page 70 




Ellwood Home in 1896 




Main Street 1908 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO 

CITY OF DEKALB 



E. L. TIMM- 

INTERIOR DECORATOR 

CARLSON FOOD STORE 

DE KALB CLEANERS 

POND STREET STORE 

SCHIMMOLER'S GROCERY & 
MARKET 



BEIERS BREAD 
STYLE SHOP 

CONSUMERS MILLINERY 
COTTAGE TOG SHOP 
CLIDDEN GREEN HOUSE 



Page 71 



THE MEN AND WOMEN 

OF 

CYCLONE FENCE 

SALUTE 

DEKALB 

ON ITS 

lOOirh BIRTHDAY 



We look forward to another century of working to- 
gether for a brighter and more prosperous future. 



CYCLONE FENCE 

American Steel and Wire Division 
UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION 




Page 72 



The PAST Is History 

The FUTURE Is Promise 




DE KALB HAS grown and progressed in a century. In all worthwhile, 
community improving projects and efforts The First National Bank 
in DeKalb has been a loyal participant. 

THIS AREA IS on the threshold of new and greater achievements and 
this bank, bolstered by the confidence created over years, eagerly an- 
ticipates the challenge of the future. 



We can never become any larger than our customers permit. 



First National Bank In DeKalb 

Member Federal Reserve System 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




2 OUTSTANDING CENTENNIALS 



1 DEDICATED GOAL 



'To provide a more wholesome and abundant life for 
everyone through steady progress, advancement and service. 



THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER COMPANY 

DEKALB DIVISION • DEKALB, ILLINOIS 



WORLD'S LARGEST BUILDER OF QUALITY KEYBOARD INSTRUMENTS